Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I have an vector of records that implement a protocol, and want to map the return value of a method of each of those records to another vector, is there a clean way to do that? I can just use map with an anonymous function wrapping the call to the method, but that seems a bit clunky.

Edited:

Well, actually, there's nothing to this. You just use the method as the function in first argument to the call to map.

(map mymethod myrecords)

Due to an unrelated mistake, that wasn't working for me and I thought I had to do...

(map #(mymethod %) myrecords)

...which is what I thought was clunky. So the question is invalid.

share|improve this question
    
why does that seem clunky? it perfectly does concurrent processing of records which is one of clojure's main motives –  KaKa Jul 22 '11 at 4:41
    
How does concurrency come into play here? The map function returns a lazy sequence, but does not make any promise regarding parallel processing to yield the elements in that lazy sequence. Were you thinking of pmap? –  seh Jul 22 '11 at 4:57
    
yes,i understood it the wrong way,yeah pmap. –  KaKa Jul 22 '11 at 6:42
3  
nothing wrong with answering your own question and accepting the answer. That way the question will be searchable for others and show up as solved. –  Arthur Ulfeldt Jul 22 '11 at 20:23
    
@KaKa, it's a bit clunky because the closure literal doesn't do anything in-and-of-itself, it just directly wraps the other function. It doesn't add anything, so it's noise. –  Daniel Lyons Jul 22 '11 at 21:57

1 Answer 1

Methods on records work with map like every other method:

(defprotocol Foo 
  (foo [this]))

(defrecord Bar [bar]
   Foo 
   (foo [this] bar)

(map foo [(Bar. 1) (Bar. 2)])
=> (1 2)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.