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Is it possible to write a where statement that uses the column name that has been assigned to the column rather than the column name that actually exists? The entire table is created dynamically with the column names stored in another table. I have a function that allows users to add filters to an jobect before retrieving the set of data that goes with it.

Example of what I am trying:

SELECT id, 
  col1 as [description], 
  col2 as [date1], 
  col3 as [image], 
  col4 as [date2], 
  col5 as [link], 
  col6 as [location], 
  col7 as [price], 
  col8 as [title]
FROM tableName
WHERE [title] = 'Lemons'
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2  
Have you actually tried this? –  Chris Jul 22 '11 at 4:52
    
@Chris - I'm not the OP, but I'm not sure what you are asking for here. Are you asking the OP if the above does indeed not work? If so, the answer is yes, it does not work. –  BiggsTRC Jul 22 '11 at 5:05
    
What I'm getting at is that it would have been quicker to plug this in and try to run it. –  Chris Jul 22 '11 at 5:27
    
Of course I tried it. The example is just to show the thought process. Some people don't seem to get it if you just write a paragraph, but if you add some code that shows what you are trying to do it becomes a bit more obvious. –  Rumpleteaser Jul 25 '11 at 23:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Make your original query a subquery:

SELECT *
FROM (
   SELECT id, 
     col1 as [description], 
     col2 as [date1], 
     col3 as [image], 
     col4 as [date2], 
     col5 as [link], 
     col6 as [location], 
     col7 as [price], 
     col8 as [title]
   FROM tableName
) as subquery
WHERE [title] = 'Lemons'
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Keith's answer is correct, but I will expound upon the why. You cannot reference a column alias in the WHERE clause. The reason for this is based upon the order that the system processes the command. We look at this command and read from the top down. However, the database engine looks at it based as a set of statements. It reads your FROM statement first to determine which tables to access. It then reads your WHERE statement to figure out what data to include/exclude. Finally it looks at your SELECT statement to determine what data to show.

Because the overall statement is evaluated in this order, the WHERE statement does not have access to the aliases created in the SELECT statement because those aliases have not yet been processed. Therefore, it is not strictly possible to reference a column alias in the WHERE statement. The common way to get around this is to wrap the entire statement inside a subquery. The only issue with this is that you will then experience a performance hit. The reason for this is that you will be returning all rows and then eliminating some instead of doing the elimination before the retrieval.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for mentioning the performance hit –  Keith Jul 22 '11 at 5:14

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