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I am writing a glossary page. I have the alphabet links on the top of the page. I want to keep the top of the page (including the alphabet links) fixed, whilst the section of the page with the definitions, scrolls up/down as an alphabet is clicked.

My HTML looks a bit like this:

<html>
<head><title>My Glossary</title></head>
<body>
        <div id="top">
            <a href="#A">A</a> |
             <a href="#B">B</a> |
            <a href="#Z">Z</a>
        </div>

        <div id="term-defs">
           <dl>
               <span id="A"></span>
               <dt>foo</dt>
               <dd>This is the sound made by a fool</dd>
               <!-- and so on ... ->
           </dl>
        </div>
</body>
</html>

[Edit]

The kind of effect I am trying to create is similar to the one here. The difference being that in the example in the link, the page scrolling is done when a user clicks on a category. In my case, I want to scroll the page when an index (i.e. an alphabet) at the top of the page, is clicked.

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4  
+1 for not assuming that Javascript is the answer to everything. –  Mike Jul 22 '11 at 6:46
17  
I know the answer: it is "frames". Oops, wrong decade. –  bdares Jul 22 '11 at 6:47
1  
Nice question. It would be good if you edited the title, so other people who want to do this can find the question. –  Marcin Jul 22 '11 at 6:49

3 Answers 3

Yes, there are a number of ways that you can do this. The "fastest" way would be to add CSS to the div similar to the following

#term-defs {
height: 300px;
overflow: scroll; }

This will force the div to be scrollable, but this might not get the best effect. Another route would be to absolute fix the position of the items at the top, you can play with this by doing something like this.

#top {
  position: fixed;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  z-index: 999;
  width: 100%;
  height: 23px;
}

This will fix it to the top, on top of other content with a height of 23px.

The final implementation will depend on what effect you really want.

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5  
just clarifying in case the OP doesn't know, z-index is the magic here. It lifts the div "above" the other items on the page and let's them scroll under and "past" it. –  Andrew Heath Jul 22 '11 at 7:12
    
@mitchel: thanks for your help. I tried it, but the effect was not quite what I was looking for. I have edited my question to perhaps explain more clearly, the sort of effect I am trying to achieve - hopefully in a CSS only solution (maybe its not possible?) –  oompahloompah Jul 22 '11 at 7:47

You can do something like this:

<html>
<head><title>My Glossary</title></head>
<body style="margin:0px;">
        <div id="top" style="position:fixed;background:white;width:100%;">
            <a href="#A">A</a> |
             <a href="#B">B</a> |
            <a href="#Z">Z</a>
        </div>

        <div id="term-defs" style="padding-top:1em;">
           <dl>
               <span id="A"></span>
               <dt>foo</dt>
               <dd>This is the sound made by a fool</dd>
               <!-- and so on ... ->
           </dl>
        </div>
</body>
</html>

It's the position:fixed that's most important, because it takes the top div from the normal page flow and fixes it at it's pre-determined position. It's also important to use the padding-top:1em because otherwise the term-defs div would start right under the top div. The background and width are there to cover the contents of the term-defs div as they scroll under the top div.

Hope this helps.

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How do you decide if padding-top would be 1em or more? –  TechMaze May 14 at 18:38
    
It's actually the height of the item(s) you want fixed at the top. In this case it was 1em because the fixed <div> is one line of text. –  fsaftoiu May 15 at 19:03

You can simply make the top div fixed:

#top { position: fixed; top: 20px; left: 20px; }
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protected by Paul Vargas Mar 29 at 21:50

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