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I got inspired to try out Haskell again based on a recent answer. My big block is that reading a file line by line (a task made simple in languages such as Perl) seems complicated in a functional language. How do you read a file line by line in your favorite language?


So that we are comparing apples to other types of apples, please write a program that numbers the lines of the input file. So if your input is:

Line the first.
Next line.
End of communication.

The output would look like:

1       Line the first.
2       Next line.
3       End of communication.

I will post my Haskell program as an example.


Ken commented that this question does not specify how errors should be handled. I'm not overly concerned about it because:

  1. Most answers did the obvious thing and read from stdin and wrote to stdout. The nice thing is that it puts the onus on the user to redirect those streams the way they want. So if stdin is redirected from a non-existent file, the shell will take care of reporting the error, for instance.

  2. The question is more aimed at how a language does IO than how it handles exceptions.

But if necessary error handling is missing in an answer, feel free to either edit the code to fix it or make a note in the comments.

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2  
@jms that is not why reputation is in place. If a question does not have a real answer and it is just discussion, it should be CW. –  ryeguy Mar 24 '09 at 19:18
1  
The founders are with Jon on this. Either vote to close it for the reason "should be community wiki", edit the question multiple times to make it auto-convert, or let it auto-convert after 30 answers. Or of course just don't vote for it! There's no need to pressure people to check that box. –  dreeves Mar 24 '09 at 20:16
1  
Clarification please! Error handling? The Ruby, Lisp, super-verbose Java, and one of the two Python programs won't leak the open file descriptor if something goes wrong. Many of the others will. In some languages, the difference between these is huge. –  Ken Mar 27 '09 at 22:41
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56 Answers

SQL Anywhere

create table t ( id int default autoincrement, line long varchar );
load table t ( line ) using file 'file' defaults on;
select id || ' ' || line from t;
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D

scope file = new File ("sample.txt");

foreach (ulong n, char[] line; file) {
    writefln ("%d  %s", n, line);
}
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J

>(4 :'<(>x),>y'/@:,(<@":"0@}.@i.@>:@#,.[)((<@((9{a.),[));.2)1!:1[3)1!:2[4

Seriously. Okay, maybe not so serious about the "your favorite language" part. But serious about it working:

$ jconsole
   >(4 :'<(>x),>y'/@:,(<@":"0@}.@i.@>:@#,.[)((<@((9{a.),[));.2)1!:1[3)1!:2[4
Line the first.
Next line.
End of communication.
^D
1       Line the first.
2       Next line.
3       End of communication.

I'm sure there's shorter ways of writing it -- my brain is simply not up to the challenge.

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Common Lisp

(defun number-lines (file)
  (with-open-file (stream file)
    (loop for line = (read-line stream nil nil) and line-number from 1
          while line do (format t "~a~a~a~%" line-number #\tab line))))
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C#

using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(@"c:\MyFile.txt"))
    for (string line; (line = reader.ReadLine()) != null;)
        Console.WriteLine("{0} {1}", (Console.CursorTop + 1).ToString(), line);

Tried a few tricks to keep it compact. :-) [Notice, still disposing Reader and no boxing :-)]

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Scala

var lineNumber = 1
for (line <- Source.fromFile("file.txt").getLines) {
    println(lineNumber + "\t" + line)
    lineNumber += 1
}
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Objective-C/Cocoa

I tried to keep the program as short as possible, without resorting to any standard C functions.

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>
int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    NSAutoreleasePool *pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];
    NSStringEncoding encoding;
    NSString *input = [NSString stringWithContentsOfFile:@"path_to_file" usedEncoding:&encoding error:nil];
    NSArray *lineArray = [input componentsSeparatedByCharactersInSet:[NSCharacterSet newlineCharacterSet]];
    int lineNumber = 1;
    for (NSString *line in lineArray) {
        NSString *output = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d\t%@\n", lineNumber++, line];
        NSData *outputData = [output dataUsingEncoding:encoding];
        [[NSFileHandle fileHandleWithStandardOutput] writeData:outputData];
    }
    [pool release];
    return 0;
}

Of course, for a large input file, you might improve performance by periodically releasing and recreating the autorelease pool inside of the loop. :-)

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VB6 / VBA

Private Sub ReadFile(ByVal pFilePath As String)

  Dim iFileNum As Integer
  Dim iCtr As Integer
  Dim sLine As String

  iCtr = 0
  iFileNum = FreeFile

  Open pFilePath For Input As #iFileNum

  Do While Not EOF(iFileNum)
    iCtr = iCtr + 1
    Input #iFileNum, sLine
    Debug.Print iCtr; sLine
  Loop

  Close #iFileNum

End Sub
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CFScript in ColdFusion 8

<cfscript> 
    myfile = FileOpen("c:/text.txt","read");
    while(!FileIsEOF(myfile))
        WriteOutput(FileReadLine(myfile));
    FileClose(myfile);
</cfscript>
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Java

With all the error checking that should do in this method. If you pass a null String, it chucks a wobbly...

public void printLinesWithNumbers(String filename) throws FileNotFoundException
{
	Scanner sc = null;
	try
	{
		sc = new Scanner(new File(filename));
		int i = 0;
		while(sc.hasNextLine())
			System.out.println(++i + "\t" + sc.nextLine());
	}
	finally
	{
		if(sc != null)
			sc.close();
	}
}
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VB.NET

Dim lines() As String = System.IO.File.ReadAllLines("C:\file.txt")
For i As Integer = 0 To lines.Length - 1
    Console.WriteLine("{0} {1}", (i + 1).ToString, lines(i))
Next
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F#

path |> System.IO.File.ReadAllLines 
     |> Seq.iteri( fun i l -> printfn "%d\t%s" ( i + 1 ) l )

and if line numbering started at 0 it would be as easy as:

 path |> System.IO.File.ReadAllLines 
      |> Seq.iteri( printfn "%d\t%s" )

I am not a fan of File.ReadAllLines as it returns an array of strings, so we won't get any output before the whole file is read. What we need is a sequence of strings that returns a line as soon as it's read. Something like:

let readlines file = seq {
    use stream = file |> System.IO.File.OpenText
    while not stream.EndOfStream do
       yield stream.ReadLine() 
        }

And then:

path |> readlines     
     |> Seq.iteri( fun i l -> printfn "%d\t%s" ( i + 1 ) l )
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LPC

This is an ALMOST one line version. I needed a local variable for the line numbering.

int x;
write( implode( map( explode( read_file("/sample.txt"),
   "\n" ), (: (++x) + "\t" + $1 :) ), "\n" ) + "\n" );

And now you know where all my free time went during college.

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Server-side Actionscript 1 for Flash Media Server 3

var file = new File(fileName);
var i = 0;

file.open('text','read');
while (file.isOpen && !file.eof()) trace((++i)+' 'fileile.readln());
file.close();

The output is done in the log file of the application the code is running in and can only be seen by reading that file or in FMS Admin Console. :)

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Ruby

while gets; puts "#{$.}\t#{$_}"; end
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Ruby

ARGF.each_with_index { |line, i| puts "#{i + 1}\t#{line}" }
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Object Pascal

Procedural

var F: Text;
    S: String;
    I: Integer;
begin
  Assign(F, 'file.txt');
  Reset(F);
  I := 0;
  while(not eof(F)) do begin
    ReadLn(F, S);
    WriteLn(IntToStr(I) + #9 + S);
  end;
  Close(F);
end;

Object Oriented

var List: TStringList
begin
  List := TStringList.Create;
  List.LoadFromFile('file.txt');
  for I := 0 to List.Count - 1 do
    WriteLn(IntToStr(I) + #9 + List[I]);
  List.Free;
end;

(I never do the blind "with TSomethingOrOther.Create do" things, except when toying with game design.)

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Nemerle

Imperative style:

using System.IO.File;
using System.Console;

def ReadFileLineByLine(path)
{
    using (reader = OpenText(path))
    {
    	mutable lineNumber = 1;
    	while (!reader.EndOfStream)
    	{
    		WriteLine($"$lineNumber $(reader.ReadLine())");
    		++lineNumber;
    	}
    }
}

ReadFileLineByLine("test.txt");

Functional style:

using Nemerle.Utility;
using System.IO.File;
using System.Console;

ReadAllLines("test.txt").IterI((n, line) => WriteLine($"$(n+1) $line"));
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C#

There's allready an answer up for C#, but when I was tought how to read textfile, I was shown this:

using(FileStream fs = new FileStream(path, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read))
{
  using(StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(fs))
  {
    while(!sr.EndOfStream)
    {
      list.Add(sr.ReadLine());
    }
  }
}

The 'using" statement automatically implements try/catch, final and close(), which can be usefull but also unwanted. In this case, it's a security measure.

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FORTRAN

OPEN DATA FILE

open (file, FILE='yourDataFile.dat', STATUS='OLD')

READ DATA

read(file,*) n

if (n.GT.nmax) then

    write(*,*) 'Error: n = ', n, 'File is too large'

    goto 9999

endif

LOOP OVER DATA

do 10 i= 1, n

   read(u,100) dataX(i), dataY(i), dataZ(i)

10 enddo
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Qbasic 1.1

Open "file.txt" for input as #1
do
input #1, pp$
print pp$
loop until (eof(#1))

Simple and easy no?

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Delphi

with TFileReader.Create('file') do
try

  while not EOF do
  begin
    WriteLine(IntToStr(Line) + ReadLine);
    Inc(Line);
  end;

finally
  Free;
end
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1  
I don't think this prints the line number or the line itself. –  Jon Ericson Mar 25 '09 at 16:43
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erlang

{ok, FD} = file:open("filename", [read]),
readall(FD),
close(FD).

readall(FD) ->
   readall(FD,[]).

readall(FD,eof) ->
   [];
readall(FD,{error,_}) ->
   [];
readall(FD,_) ->
   Data = io:get_line(FD),
   io:format("~s~n",[Data]),
   readall(FD,Data).
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VBScript

Const ForReading = 1
Dim oFSO, oFile, i

Set oFSO  = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
Set oFile = oFSO.OpenTextFile(strFileName, ForReading)

i = 1
While Not oFile.AtEndOfStream
  WScript.Echo  i & vbTab & oFile.ReadLine
  i = i + 1
Wend

oFile.Close
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Windows Batch File

@echo off
setlocal enableextensions enabledelayedexpansion

for /f "delims=" %%s in (file.txt) do (
  @echo !i! %%s
  set /a i += 1
)
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Scala 2.8 RC1:

Source.fromPath("Hello.txt").getLines().zipWithIndex foreach {
  case(line, index) ⇒ println("%4d\t%s" format (index + 1, line))
}
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