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I have a class (Class A) which contains objects of type Class B. Class B has three subclasses.

Should Class B actually be an interface and then I can draw an aggregation association between the interface and Class A (and the three subclasses implement the interface)

or

Should Class B, be an actual Class, have 3 sub-classes and all four of the classes (Class B + 3 subclasses) implement the interface (through Class B)?

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would say to ask yourself these questions: 1. Would you ever create an instance of Class B? If yes, then it should be a regular class. If not, 2. Should class B contain any functionality that the derived classes should be able to use? If yes you should create an abstract class that the other classes inherit, if no, make it an interface.

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So if I opt for the latter interface option, then I can still draw an aggregation association between Class A and the interface? –  Jean Jul 22 '11 at 11:04
    
Yes, you should be able to do that. Observe though that I'm a C# programmer so depending on the language you use it might be different. –  Emil Badh Jul 22 '11 at 12:25
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If Class A contains objects of type Class B that means that Class B is instantiated, therefore it can't be an interface.

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Not entirely true. They could be instantiated as the subclasses but referenced as the interface types. –  Emil Badh Jul 22 '11 at 11:00
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