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I have a situation (I'm guessing is pretty standard) where I need to perform some business calculations and create a bunch of records in the database. If anything goes wrong at any point I need to roll everything back from the database. Obviosly I need some kind of transaction. My question is where do I implement transaction support. Here's my example

//BillingServices - This is my billing service layer. called from the UI
public Result GenerateBill(BillData obj)
{
     //Validate BillData

     //Create a receivable line item in the receivables ledger 
     BillingRepository.Save(receivableItem);

     //Update account record to reflect new billing information
     BillingRepository.Save(accountRecord);

     //...do a some other stuff
     BillingRepository.Save(moreStuffInTheDatabase);
}

If any of the updates to the database fail I need to roll the other ones back and get out. Do I just expose a Connection object through my Repository in which I can call

Connection.BeginTransaction()

or do I do I just validate in the service layer and just call one method in the repository that saves all the objects and handles the transaction? This doesn't quite seem right to me. It's seem like it would force me to put to much business logic in the data layer.

What's the right approach? What if I need to span repositories (or would that be bad design)?

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1  
+1, good question. –  George Stocker Mar 24 '09 at 19:43
    
Hopefully I'll get a good answer =) . Actually any answer at this point would be nice –  Micah Mar 24 '09 at 19:44
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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I'm assuming that you are using .NET here. That being the case, you can simply wrap the entire code section in a using statement with a TransactionScope instance and it will handle the transaction semantics for you. You simply have to call the Complete method at the end:

//BillingServices - This is my billing service layer. called from the UI
public Result GenerateBill(BillData obj)
{
     // Create the transaction scope, this defaults to Required.
     using (TransactionScope txScope = new TransactionScope())
     {
          //Validate BillData

          //Create a receivable line item in the receivables ledger 
          BillingRepository.Save(receivableItem);

          //Update account record to reflect new billing information
          BillingRepository.Save(accountRecord);

          //...do a some other stuff
          BillingRepository.Save(moreStuffInTheDatabase);

          // Commit the transaction.
          txScope.Complete();
     }
}

If an exception occurs, this has the effect of not calling Complete when the code block is exited; the Dispose method on the TransactionScope implementation of the IDisposable interface is called when the scope of the using statement is exited.

In the Dispose call, it checks to see if the transaction completed (this state is set when Complete succeeds). If that state isn't set, it performs a rollback.

You can then nest this within other TransactionScope instances (deeper in your call stack on the same thread) to create larger transactions across multiple repositories.

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So is what I'm doing pretty standard, and is this the solution that is most common? –  Micah Mar 24 '09 at 19:49
    
@Micah: Assuming you are using .NET, yes, this is the preferred method when you want to span a transaction across multiple methods/objects/transactional repositories. –  casperOne Mar 24 '09 at 19:52
    
Awesome! Thanks a lot! –  Micah Mar 24 '09 at 19:56
    
Is this ok to do even with simple things like PersonRepository.SavePerson(person) PersonRepository.SaveAddress(address) Are there any concerns with using the transactionscope in simple situations like these? –  Micah Mar 24 '09 at 20:06
    
According to NHProf, everything should be wrapped in an explicit transaction, even read operations. See here: nhprof.com/Learn/Alerts/DoNotUseImplicitTransactions –  Daniel T. Jan 15 '10 at 1:18
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