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I am using JFrame to create my GUI for a desktop application. The size of the GUI I am setting according to the resolution of the platform screen using this code.

this.setSize(this.getToolkit().getScreenSize());

The problem is that when I run the application the GUI covers all of the screen. The Windows task-bar is also hidden behind the GUI.

I want that whatever the size of the task-bar is, the task-bar should be visible in all conditions. How do I achieve that?

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9  
"I am suing JFrame"...LOL –  Moonbeam Jul 22 '11 at 13:26
    
5 people thought that was a great comment, yet none of them had the rep. to edit the question? –  Andrew Thompson Jul 22 '11 at 14:48
2  
@Andrew, Apparently some people are just here for the lulz - chill. –  Moonbeam Jul 22 '11 at 14:56
4  
Humor should be left not edited. I enjoyed the laugh –  sealz Jul 22 '11 at 15:41
    
@All i just realized that i wrote "suing", a spell mistake. ;) enjoyed –  Asghar Jul 24 '11 at 13:23

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What about ?

jFrame.setState(JFrame.MAXIMIZED_BOTH);
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setState() is marked as obsolete in the Java SE 6 API –  Hunter McMillen Jul 22 '11 at 13:40
    
@Hunter lots of methods are still accesible just from java.awt.Frame –  mKorbel Jul 22 '11 at 13:44
    
I wasn't saying you couldn't use it. You can use whatever you want, but you should be consistent. So if you are going to use setState() from the java.awt.Frame class, then you should use Frame.MAXIMIZED_BOTH. I don't think you should mix the two. –  Hunter McMillen Jul 22 '11 at 13:55
    
that's about reading API Methods inherited from class java.awt.Xxx download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/javax/swing/JFrame.html –  mKorbel Jul 22 '11 at 23:18
    
@mKorbel I am confused by what you said. What is about reading the API? –  Hunter McMillen Jul 24 '11 at 20:30

Since you are using a JFrame you should just call:

jFrame.setExtendedState(JFrame.MAXIMIZED_BOTH);

This takes into account the position of the taskbar.

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this is not working in my case :) –  Asghar Jul 22 '11 at 13:37
    
What is it doing when you call this? Is it covering the taskbar? –  Hunter McMillen Jul 22 '11 at 13:38
    
yes this is covering all the screen, i just want my GUI should work in all screen resolution, thats why i am setting GUI size according to platform screen, i think i should set hardcoded fized size ..should i? –  Asghar Jul 22 '11 at 13:42
    
Hmm, using JFrame.MAXIMIZED_BOTH should take into account the taskbar, it does on my machine atleast. –  Hunter McMillen Jul 22 '11 at 13:44
    
:+1 :) it is not working on my Machine, i think i should get screen insets and the set my GUI size according to that. –  Asghar Jul 22 '11 at 13:47

Is your task-bar set to auto-hide?

I just ran this test code on my Windows 7 machine.

import java.awt.Frame;
import javax.swing.*;

class TestFrameSize {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                JFrame f = new JFrame("Test Screen Size");
                f.setAlwaysOnTop(true);
                f.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
                System.out.println(f.getToolkit().getScreenSize());
                f.setExtendedState(Frame.MAXIMIZED_BOTH);
                f.setVisible(true);
                System.out.println(f.getSize());
            }
        });
    }
}

In fact, I ran it twice. Here is the output:

Task-bar configured to 'auto-hide'

java.awt.Dimension[width=1920,height=1080]
java.awt.Dimension[width=1928,height=1088]

(In which the frame seems to be 8 pixels taller & wider than the available screen space - odd.)

Task-bar not configured to 'auto-hide'

java.awt.Dimension[width=1920,height=1080]
java.awt.Dimension[width=1928,height=1048]

40 pixels shorter, and no longer covering the task-bar.

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1  
+1 for experimental data. A similar height change obtains with hiding the Mac OS X dock, although the width remains constant. –  trashgod Jul 22 '11 at 17:38
    
I get similar results. Then I added 'f.setUndecorated(true);' after your first System.out. The result is the same two identical Dimensions (and a full screen window covering the task bar) –  Bryan Young Sep 9 '11 at 20:04
    
@Bryan Maybe you should ask a separate question based on that specific requirement. –  Andrew Thompson Sep 10 '11 at 7:00
    
Good idea. It might not be as closely related to this as I thought. - new question –  Bryan Young Sep 13 '11 at 14:45

you should be able to find the TaskbarHeight with a method

say getTaskbarHeight();

the minus that from

setFullScreen();

I found this example online

Setting screen size - taskBar

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this solution doesn't take into consideration multiple monitors, or the task bar being docked on the sides of the screen. Adding logic for the width isn't a big deal, but I don't see a good way to determine which screen the frame is on. –  Bryan Young Sep 9 '11 at 19:59

Perhaps you shoud use GraphicsDevice.setFullScreenWindow() instead of setFullScreen(). It will maximize a window as opposed to using the screen fully in a "sort-of" non windowed mode.

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that is for full screen exclusive mode. He wants to maximize the window with the task bar showing. –  Bryan Young Sep 9 '11 at 19:57

It is quite a lot easier than all this! The taskbar exists in the insets of the screen. So to get the space you want to occupy just use the results of the following two calls:

Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().getScreenInsets(f.getGraphicsConfiguration())

and

f.getGraphicsConfiguration().getBounds();

where f is a window on the same screen as the taskbar.

Do not use Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().getScreenSize(); because it will give you the size of the first screen but not necessarily the screen you are on.

Try playing around with the below frame while you

  • move the window from one screen to another
  • drag the task-bar from one edge to another of each screen
  • resize the task-bar
  • make the task-bar autohide
  • adjust your screen resolution.

Each time you press the button it will faithfully print out everything you need to known about the task-bar's position.

import javax.swing.*;
import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;

public class TaskBarExplorer {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        final Frame f = new JFrame("F");
        JButton b = new JButton("do");
        b.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                print("current device");
                print(f.getGraphicsConfiguration());

                GraphicsDevice[] gds = GraphicsEnvironment.getLocalGraphicsEnvironment().getScreenDevices();
                print("");
                print("all devices");
                for (GraphicsDevice gd : gds) {
                    print(gd.getDefaultConfiguration());
                }
                print("");
            }
        });
        f.add(b);
        f.setSize(100, 100);
        f.setLocation(600, 400);
        f.setVisible(true);
    }
    private static void print(GraphicsConfiguration gc) {
        print("insets: " + Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().getScreenInsets(gc));
        print("bounds: " + gc.getBounds());
    }
    private static void print(String s) {
        System.out.println(s);
    }

}

Some example output for the lazy (this is from one execution, button pressed after different adjustments):

current device
insets: java.awt.Insets[top=0,left=0,bottom=78,right=0]
bounds: java.awt.Rectangle[x=0,y=0,width=1280,height=1024]

all devices
insets: java.awt.Insets[top=0,left=0,bottom=78,right=0]
bounds: java.awt.Rectangle[x=0,y=0,width=1280,height=1024]
insets: java.awt.Insets[top=0,left=0,bottom=0,right=0]
bounds: java.awt.Rectangle[x=1280,y=0,width=800,height=600]

current device
insets: java.awt.Insets[top=0,left=0,bottom=0,right=0]
bounds: java.awt.Rectangle[x=1280,y=0,width=800,height=600]

all devices
insets: java.awt.Insets[top=0,left=0,bottom=78,right=0]
bounds: java.awt.Rectangle[x=0,y=0,width=1280,height=1024]
insets: java.awt.Insets[top=0,left=0,bottom=0,right=0]
bounds: java.awt.Rectangle[x=1280,y=0,width=800,height=600]

current device
insets: java.awt.Insets[top=0,left=0,bottom=0,right=58]
bounds: java.awt.Rectangle[x=1280,y=0,width=800,height=600]

all devices
insets: java.awt.Insets[top=0,left=0,bottom=0,right=0]
bounds: java.awt.Rectangle[x=0,y=0,width=1280,height=1024]
insets: java.awt.Insets[top=0,left=0,bottom=0,right=58]
bounds: java.awt.Rectangle[x=1280,y=0,width=800,height=600]
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I know this is old question but when i use jFrame.setExtendedState(JFrame.MAXIMIZED_BOTH); or the setState it displays it properly while displaying it for the first time. When I minimize it and again maximize it, it again covers the Task Bar. I am using Windows 7 and Java 1.7.

I found the solution here

f.setExtendedState(JFrame.MAXIMIZED_BOTH);  
GraphicsEnvironment env = GraphicsEnvironment.getLocalGraphicsEnvironment();  
f.setMaximizedBounds(env.getMaximumWindowBounds());  
f.setVisible(true);  

this should do the trick.

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