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Something like this:

Namespace Test_NS
    Partial Class Test_WebSite
        Inherits System.Web.UI.Page

    End Class
End Namespace

Or should I leave it alone and only keep the classes in my App_Code under a Namespace?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It makes little difference for a project. By default, your code-behind is NOT in a shared name-space. Also, your classes (I assume you're still talking code-behind) are not stored in the app_code folder.

Do you use visual studio? It will do the organizing for you, and if you're not sure, then I'd just leave everything as-is.

Any new .vb files (not code-behind) that you create independently do go in the app_code folder, and you can group these in name-spaces (or not) as you wish.

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Well any classes (code-behind) outside of the ASPX I let VS put in the App_Code folder, but I put those under a Namespace. The ASPX code-behind I was wondering if it best or even good practice to put that under a namespace or just leave as is. –  dotnetN00b Jul 22 '11 at 15:31
1  
Yes -- that's what I mean -- leave as-is. You can decide to customize your code-behind files by combining them into a single namespace if you want, but then you'll also have to customize the page directive on each aspx page. Also, it will affect your publishing / compiling experience a bit. I wouldn't say you can't combine your code-behind into a single name-space, but it seems like more work, so unless you have a good reason to do it, why would you want to? –  宮本 武蔵 Jul 22 '11 at 15:40
    
As far as ASPX code behind, I have no reason. I was just wondering if it was common, good practice or best practice to do so. That's all. Thanks! –  dotnetN00b Jul 22 '11 at 16:17

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