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I have a NetBeans file "nbproject/project.properties" that always shows up in the "Changes not staged for commit" section (when I do git status). How could I move this to the Untracked files section (without adding it to .gitignore) ? I tried this command git rm --cached but what happened is the file shows as untracked in my local repo and got removed in the remote one but what I want is to keep it in remote and untrack only in local repo.

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Why would you not want to track the file if its in the remote repo? –  yasouser Jul 22 '11 at 15:33
    
so the file is changed by other team member in the remote repo and i want to get their change's but i dont want to commit my change. –  Jimmy Jul 22 '11 at 19:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 18 down vote accepted

You could update your index:

git update-index --assume-unchanged nbproject/project.properties

and make sure it never shows as "updated" in your current repo.
That means it won't ever been pushed, but it is still present in the index.
(and it can be modified at will in your local working tree).


git update-index --no-assume-unchanged 
git ls-files -v | grep '^h '
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Thanks, And if you want to revert that do i do "--no-assume-unchanged" or git add ? –  Jimmy Jul 25 '11 at 16:44
    
@Jimmy: see gitready.com/intermediate/2009/02/18/…: git update-index --no-assume-unchanged <file> –  VonC Jul 25 '11 at 17:28
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I tried this but when I check out a commit or do a pull, the file still gets modified. –  Cam Mar 2 '12 at 20:16
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Also, to see all the files marked assume-unchanged: $ git ls-files -v | grep '^h ' –  Gabe Kopley Feb 25 '13 at 18:12
    
@GabeKopley interesting. I have included your comment in the answer for more visibility. –  VonC Feb 25 '13 at 18:17

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