Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

How can I create a basic custom window chrome for a WPF window, that doesn't include the close button and still a moveable and resizeable window?

share|improve this question
1  
    
I checked that out...but was looking for more of a tutorial... – Carl Weis Jul 22 '11 at 15:32
    
An oldish, but still relevant question here: Creating Bordless Windows with custom visual. – DK. Jul 22 '11 at 21:46
up vote 33 down vote accepted

You set your Window's WindowStyle="None", then build your own window interface. You need to build in your own Min/Max/Close/Drag event handlers, but Resizing is still maintained.

For example:

<Window 
    WindowState="Maximized" 
    WindowStyle="None"
    WindowStartupLocation="CenterScreen"
    MaxWidth="{Binding Source={x:Static SystemParameters.WorkArea}, Path=Width}"
    MaxHeight="{Binding Source={x:Static SystemParameters.WorkArea}, Path=Height}"
>

    <DockPanel x:Name="RootWindow">
        <DockPanel x:Name="TitleBar">
            <Button x:Name="CloseButton" DockPanel.Dock="Right" />
            <Button x:Name="MaxButton" DockPanel.Dock="Right" />
            <Button x:Name="MinButton" DockPanel.Dock="Right" />

            <TextBlock HorizontalAlignment="Center">Application Name</TextBlock>
        </DockPanel>

        <ContentControl Content="{Binding CurrentPage}" />
    </DockPanel>

</Window>

And here's some example code-behind for common window functionality

/// <summary>
/// TitleBar_MouseDown - Drag if single-click, resize if double-click
/// </summary>
private void TitleBar_MouseDown(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e)
{
    if(e.ChangedButton == MouseButton.Left)
        if (e.ClickCount == 2)
        {
            AdjustWindowSize();
        }
        else
        {
            Application.Current.MainWindow.DragMove();
        }
 }

/// <summary>
/// CloseButton_Clicked
/// </summary>
private void CloseButton_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
   Application.Current.Shutdown();
}

/// <summary>
/// MaximizedButton_Clicked
/// </summary>
private void MaximizeButton_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    AdjustWindowSize();
}

/// <summary>
/// Minimized Button_Clicked
/// </summary>
private void MinimizeButton_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    this.WindowState = WindowState.Minimized;
}

/// <summary>
/// Adjusts the WindowSize to correct parameters when Maximize button is clicked
/// </summary>
private void AdjustWindowSize()
{
    if (this.WindowState == WindowState.Maximized)
    {
        this.WindowState = WindowState.Normal;
        MaximizeButton.Content = "1";
    }
    else
    {
        this.WindowState = WindowState.Maximized;
        MaximizeButton.Content = "2";
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - good solution for title bar mouse handling – DK. Jul 23 '11 at 0:15
2  
Actually, use of this -vs- main window -vs- application is a bit hectic (as in error-prone). Alex had more solid implementation, though it also misses few minor functional pieces. – DK. Jul 23 '11 at 4:12

.NET 4.5 added a new class that greatly simplifies this.

The WindowChrome class enables you to extend Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) content into the non-client area of a window that is typically reserved for the operating system’s window manager.

You can find a tutorial here.

And here's a short example usage.

share|improve this answer

I've published a code sample here which contains custom behaviors and commands to replace all the default Window behaviors when using a WPF custom window. Hopefully it can be useful to you.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.