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I'm experimenting with the HTML5 File API, and I'm needing to use a method which I don't know enough about (simply because it's hardly documented anywhere).

I'm talking about the FileWriter truncate() method, and I know it does what I need to do. Basically, rather than appending text to some file data or using seek() to overwrite a certain portion, I want to overwrite all of the data with something else (e.g. from "somedata" to "").

Here's a snippet of the FileWriter setup from HTML5Rocks, with truncate() added in.

function onInitFs(fs) {

  fs.root.getFile('log.txt', {create: false}, function(fileEntry) {

    // Create a FileWriter object for our FileEntry (log.txt).
    fileEntry.createWriter(function(fileWriter) {

      fileWriter.seek(fileWriter.length); // Start write position at EOF.
      fileWriter.truncate(1);

      // Create a new Blob and write it to log.txt.
      var bb = new BlobBuilder(); // Note: window.WebKitBlobBuilder in Chrome 12.
      bb.append('Hello World');
      fileWriter.write(bb.getBlob('text/plain'));

    }, errorHandler);

  }, errorHandler);

}

window.requestFileSystem(window.PERSISTENT, 1024*1024, onInitFs, errorHandler);

When it gets to calling writer.truncate(), calling writer.write() throws a File Exception error. I believe this is because the readyState is set to WRITING. Unfortunately, I don't know how to get around that.

I've already tried looking through the HTML5Rocks section on this, but it doesn't tell me anything about a truncate() method (although I know it exists from what the Webkit JS Console tells me).

Long story short, how I can I use the truncate() method correctly without getting an error?

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2  
W3C truncate spec enjoy. –  Raynos Jul 22 '11 at 15:55
    
Why truncate(1)? Why not truncate(0) to get a zero-sized file? –  huyz Aug 23 '11 at 5:18

2 Answers 2

Something like this might be a little more to the point:

truncate Changes the length of the file to that specified

fileEntry.createWriter(function(fileWriter) {
    var truncated = false;
    fileWriter.onwriteend = function(e) {
        if (!truncated) {
            truncated = true;
            this.truncate(this.position);
            return;
        }
        console.log('Write completed.');
    };
    fileWriter.onerror = function(e) {
        console.log('Write failed: ' + e.toString());
    };
    var blob = new Blob(['helo'], {type: 'plain/text'});
    fileWriter.write(blob);
}, errorHandler);
share|improve this answer

You need to be more async'y. :)

fileEntry.createWriter(function(fileWriter) {

  fileWriter.onwriteend = function(trunc) {
    fileWriter.onwriteend = null; // Avoid an infinite loop.
    // Create a new Blob and write it to log.txt.
    var bb = new BlobBuilder(); // Note: window.WebKitBlobBuilder in Chrome 12.
    bb.append('Hello World');
    fileWriter.write(bb.getBlob('text/plain'));
  }

  fileWriter.seek(fileWriter.length); // Start write position at EOF.
  fileWriter.truncate(1);

}, errorHandler);
share|improve this answer
1  
I could be wrong, but I believe that this will cause infinite recursion since you're constantly triggering onwriteend. So you may need to nullify onwriteend from within it. –  huyz Aug 23 '11 at 5:10
    
Good catch. In code I've written, I've always wanted to replace onwriteend anyway to establish the followup code. I was rewriting the original code to use the async truncate, but I didn't think about replacing/nullifying the onwriteend function. –  Derek Dean Sep 8 '11 at 15:00

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