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As you can see in the code below, the DoStuff() method is getting called before the Init() one during the construction of a Child object.

I'm in a situation where I have numerous child classes. Therefore, repeating a call to the DoStuff() method directly after Init() in the constructor of each child wouldn't be an elegant solution.

Is there any way I could create some kind of post constructor in the parent class that would be executed after the child's constructor? This way, I could call to the DoStuff() method there.

If you have any other design idea which could solve my problem, I'd like to hear it too!

abstract class Parent
{
    public Parent()
    {
        DoStuff();
    }

    protected abstract void DoStuff();
}

class Child : Parent
{
    public Child()
    // DoStuff is called here before Init
    // because of the preconstruction
    {
        Init();
    }

    private void Init()
    {
        // needs to be called before doing stuff
    }

    protected override void DoStuff() 
    {
        // stuff
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Found this link that shows order of construction... csharp411.com/c-object-initialization basically states that your derived instance constructor is last on the list of stuff to do. I think pulling DoStuff out of the base class constructor and explicitely calling it is the most straightforeward approach, or providing a base class Init that can be overridden. –  deepee1 Jul 22 '11 at 16:20
    
+1: I don't know why but I always (incorrectly) assumed the child constructor was called first; which is why I always used :base() in my constructor calls. Thanks for educating me. –  Chris Lively Sep 15 '11 at 15:08

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

How about this:

abstract class Parent
{
    public Parent()
    {
        Init();
        DoStuff();
    }

    protected abstract void DoStuff();
    protected abstract void Init();
}

class Child : Parent
{
    public Child()
    {
    }

    protected override void Init()
    {
        // needs to be called before doing stuff
    }

    protected override void DoStuff() 
    {
        // stuff
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'd argue calling Init() before Parent's DoStuff in Child's DoStuff is the better option, so that the base class remains unaware of the need to perform initialization operations (unless, of course, ALL subclasses end up requiring it...) –  Dan J Jul 22 '11 at 16:27
    
But parent's DoStuff is abstract, there isn't actually a method there. Both DoStuff and Init are on the Child. I agree though, if some children don't need to call Init then this solution becomes troublesome. –  taylonr Jul 22 '11 at 17:37
    
-1 Do not you see that class hierarchy and constructor initialization itself covers both DoStuff() and Init() in current implementation? It's useless pieces of junky code in this case –  Artur Mustafin Jul 22 '11 at 18:02
    
I did see that, but he said the order was out of whack. Therefore, my solution forces the order to be init and then DoStuff. The nice part about this solution is if you soon realize that init and/or dostuff is the same for all children, you just implement it in the base class and your code is instantly better –  taylonr Jul 25 '11 at 12:49

If you have a complex logic for constructing your objects then consider FactoryMethod pattern.

In your case I would implement it as a simple

public static Parent Construct(someParam)

method that takes some parameter and based on it decides which child class to instantiate. You can remove your DoStuff() method call from the constructor and call it inside Construct() on the new instance.

Also, you should avoid virtual/abstract method calls in the constructors. See this question for more details: Virtual member call in a constructor

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Rather than using an abstract method, which would require you to implement the method in all descendant classes, you might try:

public class Parent
{
    public Parent()
    {
        PostConstructor();
    }


    protected virtual void PostConstructor()
    {
    }
}

public class Child : Parent
{
    protected override void PostConstructor()
    {
        base.PostConstructor();

        /// do whatever initialization here that you require
    }
}

public class ChildWithoutOverride
{
    /// not necessary to override PostConstructor 
}
share|improve this answer
    
K.I.S.S. you ;) –  Artur Mustafin Jul 22 '11 at 17:50
    
@Artur ? That is pretty simple. –  David Lively Jul 22 '11 at 17:51
    
Yes +1 for elegance, i am an apologet of K.I.S.S. otherwise even tiny frameworks can easily become monstrous. –  Artur Mustafin Jul 22 '11 at 17:58
    
Ups... if someone prefer abstractionism... i advice them to remember such things make notes, which is better, or at least create compiler warnings meta attribute to mark a base class or/and method to track Init() implementations in child classes rather than affect all class hierarchy complexidy and make a complex and dirty code –  Artur Mustafin Jul 22 '11 at 18:15
3  
-1 This does not solve the problem and is misleading - PostConstructor() will actually be called before the child constructor. Using empty virtual methods instead of abstract in the solution posted by @taylonr would be the better solution if you don't need to implement Init() and DoStuff() in all child classes. –  Paul Haley Dec 9 '11 at 13:34

I would strongly suggest use Factory like a pattern.

If it's possible:

1. Push all your childs and abstract class into separate assembly.

2. Declare ctors of childs like internal methods, so no one out of that assembly is can construct them just by calling ctor.

3. Implement the Factory class to construct for caller specified objects type, which obviuoly will forse calling of abstract DoStuff() method after actual creation of anobject, but before returning it to caller.

Good thing about this is that: It will give you also additional level of abstraction, so if in the future you will need some more functions call or any other type of logical complexity, what you will need, is just add them into your Factory class.

That is.

Regards

share|improve this answer
    
Idea for when separate assembly isn't possible: for DEBUG builds, have a method in the base ctor look at the stack and make sure it was called by the factory method. –  Jared Thirsk Nov 29 '13 at 2:36
    
Another alternate idea: move child classes to it's own namespace, perhaps with a name such as MyNamespace.DoNotUseThisUseFactoryMethodInstead, so you don't using ...; it and use child ctor's by accident. –  Jared Thirsk Nov 29 '13 at 2:40

Correction: As per this answer, you can't determine when the base class's constructor is invoked during construction of the subclass.

E.g. This doesn't work:

public Child()
// DoStuff is called here after Init
// because of the overridden default constructor
{
    Init();
    base();
} 

So, yes, as others have noted, if sequence of events matters, then the base class needs to be able to accommodate that by declaring abstract methods in order, or (better yet) by having the child class's implementation of DoStuff represent the sequence of events:

protected override void DoStuff()
{
    Init();
    base.DoStuff();
}
share|improve this answer
    
In C#? I know you can do these kind of things in C++ –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jul 22 '11 at 16:20
    
-1 - base() in constructor body won't compile –  Jakub Konecki Jul 22 '11 at 16:25
    
Acknowledged, and corrected, with alternative. –  Dan J Jul 22 '11 at 16:28
    
+1 this is the answer. You can't even do it with events - I tried. –  hoodaticus Jul 22 '11 at 16:37
    
If you use Ctor() : base() {}, the base ctor will be called first. –  David Lively Jul 23 '11 at 23:50

DoStuff is abstract. Just call Init from the top of DoStuff.

share|improve this answer
    
For my scenario, Init() would need to be called in the DoStuff() override of each child, which isn't better than putting DoStuff() in the constructor of each child. Also, Init() could possibly be needed for other methods, therefore it needs to be done somewhere in the construction. –  asmo Jul 22 '11 at 16:21
1  
That makes taylonr's solution much more viable. –  Dan J Jul 22 '11 at 16:39
    
+1 His and yours are both good. –  hoodaticus Jul 22 '11 at 16:42

In WPF applications, you can postpone the invokation of DoStuff() with the help of Dispatcher:

abstract class Parent
{
    public Parent()
    {
        Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher.BeginInvoke(new Action(this.DoStuff));
    }

    private void DoStuff()
    {
        // stuff, could also be abstract or virtual
    }
}

However, it is not guaranteed that DoStuff() will be called immediately after the constructor.

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