Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

It seems like a typical issue in programming, but i didn't find nothing usefull in google. This is the code:

file=open('list.txt','r')
    for line in file:
        cursor.execute("CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS \
        %s(id INT(2) NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT, \
        entry TEXT NOT NULL)" % line)
    file.close()
    cursor.close()
    db.close()

And this is the error when I try to create a table with single quotes:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test.py", line 104, in <module>
    entry TEXT NOT NULL)" % line)
  File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.7/MySQLdb/cursors.py", line 166, in execute
    self.errorhandler(self, exc, value)
  File "/usr/lib/pymodules/python2.7/MySQLdb/connections.py", line 35, in defaulterrorhandler
    raise errorclass, errorvalue
_mysql_exceptions.ProgrammingError: (1064, "You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near ''Hi 'Buddy!(id INT(2) NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,         entry ' at line 1")

MySQLdb.escape_string(line) dont fix it by the way

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm not sure why you're doing that and I think I should suggest re-thinking your schema, but you can escape a table name with backticks `.

# notice the `'s surrounding %s
for line in file:
    cursor.execute("CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS \
    `%s`(id INT(2) NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT, \
    entry TEXT NOT NULL)" % line)
share|improve this answer
    
That worked! Thanks a lot :) Now i just get errors with entries ended with a blank space but i hope it won't be hard to fix –  jack-all-trades Jul 22 '11 at 17:10
    
Look at Python's strip method. –  cwallenpoole Jul 22 '11 at 17:11

afaik (see MySQL 5.0 Reference here) you aren't allowed to have single quotes in a table name:

Permitted characters in unquoted identifiers:

ASCII: [0-9,a-z,A-Z$_] (basic Latin letters, digits 0-9, dollar, underscore)
Extended: U+0080 .. U+FFFF
share|improve this answer
    
No. This is true for unquoted identifiers only. –  Karolis Jul 22 '11 at 16:46

Try this -

cursor.execute("CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS '%s'(id INT(2) NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT, entry TEXT NOT NULL)" % line)
share|improve this answer
    
_mysql_exceptions.ProgrammingError: (1064, "You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near '''Hey 'Buddy!'(id INT(2) NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT, entry ' at line 1") –  jack-all-trades Jul 22 '11 at 17:02

Instead of using % formatting to put in the value, pass in your statement to cursor.execute() with %s still in it for each value you need to replace, and a list or tuple of all replacement values as your second argument, for example:

stmt = "CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS %s(id INT(2) NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT, entry TEXT NOT NULL)"
value_list = [line]
cursor.execute(stmt, value_list)

This will perform all of the necessary escaping for you because it will turn your string into a valid SQL literal. This comes straight from the MySQLdb User's Guide, here is the relevant example:

To perform a query, you first need a cursor, and then you can execute queries on it:

c=db.cursor()
max_price=5
c.execute("""SELECT spam, eggs, sausage FROM breakfast
          WHERE price < %s""", (max_price,))

In this example, max_price=5 Why, then, use %s in the string? Because MySQLdb will convert it to a SQL literal value, which is the string '5'. When it's finished, the query will actually say, "...WHERE price < 5".

share|improve this answer
    
hmm.. weird, now i see the error with escaped values _mysql_exceptions.ProgrammingError: (1064, "You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near ''\\'Hey \\'Buddy!'(id INT(2) NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT, entry' at line 1") –  jack-all-trades Jul 22 '11 at 16:58

Generally, if you're trying to make table names programmatically like this, you'll be happier using a different schema. I would suggest making one table like this, with an additional column that will contain the string you are now using for the table name.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.