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I was just wondering if there was a way to bit shift a number "in place"? I've googled exactly that, and I can't find anything that pertains to what I want to do. Say I have the number 0b01001101, and I want to shift it twice to the right "in place", appending any numbers that fall off to the beginning. So it would look like 0b01010011. Is there any function in c++ that would allow me to bit shift left or right like that?

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4  
Is the term "circular shift" what you're looking for? stackoverflow.com/questions/776508/… And also you can google that term –  Yuf Jul 22 '11 at 17:05
    
Okay, how would I go about making my own? Should i just AND it with 1, if result is 1, shift right 1 and then OR it with 255 (or however large the binary is)? And similar method for left shift? –  Hondros Jul 22 '11 at 17:07
    
@Yuf Yes, I think that is exactly what I was looking for! :D –  Hondros Jul 22 '11 at 17:08
    
Look up "rotate with carry". Most processors have an instruction that performs this. –  Thomas Matthews Jul 22 '11 at 19:46
    
To nitpick, the common difference between a shift and a rotate is that a rotate involves carry (from a previous operation). –  Thomas Matthews Jul 22 '11 at 19:48

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Write one yourself, I think it's not hard.

First store the right two bits,and then do the bit shift.Finally fill the left two bits with the stored bits.

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I think I will just do this, since I need to implement it in both Python and C++. –  Hondros Jul 22 '11 at 17:09

Using the assembly instruction ror and getting the carry flag's value each time should do the work.

int rotate(int x, int n)
{
    for(int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        __asm {
            ror   x, 1            ; rotate and store limit bit in cf
            lahf                  ; get part of flags in ah
            and   ah, 1           ; get only the cf
            shl   eax, 31         ; put it at the end
            and   x, eax          ; and store in x
        }
    }

    return x;
}
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6  
While I'm impressed by the mad-crazy assembly skills, I'd imagine that this code would add enormous portability problems. –  Stargazer712 Jul 22 '11 at 17:20
    
@Stargazer712: that's the other side of the medal :P it should work on every intel's processor though –  BlackBear Jul 22 '11 at 17:22
    
It is not only portability, but this is probably less efficient than the C or C++ construct. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 22 '11 at 18:28

You want to implement a rotational shift

Here's a templatized version that should work with all types of ints (including shorts, chars, ints, and unsigned/signed alike).

template<class T>
T rotate_shift_right(T x, int shift)
{
    if ((shift > 0) && (shift < (sizeof(x)*8)))
    {
        x = ((unsigned)x >> shift) | (x << (sizeof(x) * 8 - shift));
    }
    return x;
}

template<class T>
T rotate_shift_left(T x, int shift)
{
    if ((shift > 0) && (shift < (sizeof(x)*8)))
    {
        x = (x << shift) | (((unsigned)x) >> (sizeof(x) * 8 - shift));
    }
    return x;
}
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I think shifting it and then anding the last byte onto the beginning should work.

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While this Q&A has seemingly run its course you should probably edit your answer to use "or'ing" as "anding" the last byte is the wrong operation. –  tinman Jul 22 '11 at 17:31

This is implemented as vendor-specific extensions. For MSVC, you can use _rotl8, _rotl16 (or _rotr* for rotating to the right). Not sure about GCC, but you can always drop to assembly and use the rol or ror.

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No, you should create your custom one

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this is true, though minimalistic, and answers the question –  ShinTakezou Jul 22 '11 at 17:15
    
This is really a comment, not an answer to the question. Please use "add comment" to leave feedback for the author. –  TemplateRex Aug 9 '12 at 11:38
    
@rhalbersma well, if I read again the question I think my post is actually an answer. Maybe too short (guess that's why 2 downvotes) but is correct. –  Saphrosit Aug 9 '12 at 13:39
    
@Saphrosit it is a "strict subsequence" of the accepted answer (because you don't specify how to write one), and doesn't add anything. If you self-delete, you regain your downvotes :-) –  TemplateRex Aug 9 '12 at 13:41

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