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I have this object, dive:

var dive = new Foo.Bar();

And Foo.Bar looks like this:

var Foo = {
    Bar: function() {
        ...
        return function() {
        // do stuff, no return
        };
    }
};

I'd like dive to have all the prototypes of another, existing object, however. Let's say window.Cow.prototype is:

{
    moo: function() { ... },
    eat: function() { ... }
}

What do I need to do to Foo.Bar so that I can do this:

dive.moo();
dive.eat();
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3  
You do understand that the way your code works, dive itself is a function, right? –  Šime Vidas Jul 22 '11 at 18:03
    
Why are you calling Bar as a constructor? It's defined to return a custom function... Or: Why does Bar return a custom function if it's a constructor? –  Šime Vidas Jul 22 '11 at 18:08
    
Are you trying to create callable objects? –  user113716 Jul 22 '11 at 18:24
    
Yes, patrick, I would like to return a function, but a function that I can also call functions off of. So I could do: dive() or dive.fn(). –  FoobarisMaximus Jul 22 '11 at 19:23
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4 Answers

var Foo = {
    Bar: function() {
        //...
        return this; // technically unnecessary, implied by 'new' operator
    }
};

Foo.Bar.prototype = new Cow(); // the secret sauce

dive = new Foo.Bar();

dive.moo(); // moo's like a Cow
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Here is a working example without the Bar constructor jsFiddle

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thank you for the start, jimbojw! You were close, but you gave me enough information to get it:

function Cow() {
    return {
        talk: function() {
             alert("mooo");   
        }
    };   
}

var Foo = {
    Bar: function() {
        function result() {
            alert("Foo.Bar says...");
        };
        result.prototype = new Cow();
        return new result;
    }
};

new Foo.Bar().talk();
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If you want to encapsulate Foo.Bar.prototype = you can do it without changing default constructor behavior:

function Cow() {
  this.talk =  function() {
    alert("mooo")
  }
}

var Foo = {
  Bar: function() {
    var constructor = function() {
      this.eat = function() {
        alert("gulp")
      }
    }
    constructor.prototype = new Cow()
    return constructor
  }()
}

var foo = new Foo.Bar()
foo.talk()
foo.eat()
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