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I have some objects that have a dictionary of attributes, obj.attrs. The constructor for these objects accepts a dict and/or **kwargs, for convenience.

It looks a little like this:

class Thing:
    def __init__(self, attrs={}, **kwargs):
        for arg in kwargs:
            attrs[arg] = kwargs[arg]
        self.attrs = attrs

Such that Thing({'color':'red'}) does the same as Thing(color='red').

My problem is that the constructor somehow remembers the last attrs value passed to it.

For example:

>>> thing1 = Thing(color='red')
>>> thing2 = Thing()
>>> thing2.attrs
{'color': 'red'}

...but thing2.attrs should just be an empty dict! {}

This made me wonder if this isn't a problem with using both **kwargs and an argument like attrs={}.

Any ideas?

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2  
Same principle as in "Least Astonishment" in Python: The Mutable Default Argument. –  delnan Jul 22 '11 at 18:15
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5 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The problem with using default arguments is that only one instance of them actually exists. When you say attrs={} in your init method definition, that single default {} instance is the default for every call to that method (it doesn't make a new default empty dict every time, it uses the same one).

The problem is that if there's only one attrs in existence and then for every instance of Thing you say self.attrs = attrs, the self.attrs member variable for every single one of your instance is pointing to the single shared default instance of attrs.

The other question is, isn't this completely redundant? You can use **kwargs to pass in keyword/value args or a dictionary. If you just defined this:

class Thing:
    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        for arg in kwargs:
            self.attrs[arg] = kwargs[arg]

All of these strategies still work:

thing1 = Thing(color='red')

thing2 = Thing(**{'color':'red'})

my_dict = {'color' : 'red'}
thing3 = Thing(**my_dict)

So if you simply define and use Thing that way, you'll avoid your problem altogether.

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So I take it the problem isn't **kwargs, it's the default argument? –  blob8108 Jul 22 '11 at 18:19
1  
Correct. You have to be really careful when using default arguments because the default argument's value gets created once when Python processes the def statement and then the reference to the same default is used over & over again. –  Brent Nash Jul 22 '11 at 18:22
1  
I think the other major point is that everything you want to do can be done with kwargs. You probably don't need attrs at all. –  Brent Nash Jul 22 '11 at 18:24
    
Accepted as it explains the problem and demonstrates a solution. –  blob8108 Jul 23 '11 at 7:36
    
Good to know! Can't believe I've been programming Python for 3 years now and just ran into this problem. –  MatthewKremer Oct 18 '13 at 14:45
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attrs is a reference to a dictionary. When you create a new object, self.attrs points to that dictionary. When you assign a value from a kwargs, it goes to this dictionary.

Now, when you create a second instance, it's self.attrs also points to that same dictionary. Thus, it gets whatever data is in that dictionary.

For a nice discussion of this see "Least Astonishment" in Python: The Mutable Default Argument here on stackoverflow. Also see Default Parameter Values in Python on effbot.

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You want to change your code to:

class Thing:
    def __init__(self, attrs=None, **kwargs):
        attrs = {} if attrs is None else attrs
        for arg in kwargs:
            attrs[arg] = kwargs[arg]
        self.attrs = attrs

As others have pointed out, the value of a default argument is evaluated once, at definition time, not each time the function is called. By using a mutable container, each addition to the container is seen by all subsequent calls because each call uses the same container as the default value.

It might be that you only ever use attrs as a way to provide initial values, and you never meant to share dicts at all. In that case, use this:

class Thing:
    def __init__(self, attrs=None, **kwargs):
        self.attrs = {}
        if attrs:
            self.attrs.update(attrs)
        for arg in kwargs:
            self.attrs[arg] = kwargs[arg]
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That's really sad. Now I have a hundred init routines to change... Thanks though! –  blob8108 Jul 22 '11 at 18:21
    
@blob8108: I had another thought about what you're really trying to do, and have edited it in above. –  Ned Batchelder Jul 22 '11 at 18:37
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What about changing the signature so that the dictionary is created each time

class Thing:
    def __init__(self, attrs=None, **kwargs):
        self.attrs = attrs or {}
        self.attrs.update(kwargs)
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Instead of the for loop you could just say attrs.update(kwargs) –  martineau Jul 22 '11 at 18:47
    
@martineau, updated and is much better :) thanks. –  fabrizioM Jul 22 '11 at 19:09
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Just for what it's worth - we can avoid the "attrs is a shared mutable object" problem by simply not mutating it. Instead of dumping the kwargs into attrs, dump them both into a new dict. Then the default-argument-object will always be {}.

class Thing:
    def __init__(self, attrs = {}, **kwargs):
        self.attrs = {}
        # Don't write the loop yourself!
        self.attrs.update(attrs)
        self.attrs.update(kwargs)

I'm only mentioning this because everyone's rushing to describe the "use None as a default argument and check for it" idiom, which I personally find rather hackish. sgusc has the right idea: the entire endeavour is not useful, given the general awesomeness of Python's **kwargs. :)

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