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I have written the following C# code:

_locationsByRegion = new Dictionary<string, IEnumerable<string>>();
foreach (string regionId in regionIds)
{
    IEnumerable<string> locationIds = Locations
        .Where(location => location.regionId.ToUpper() == regionId.ToUpper())
        .Select(location => location.LocationId); //If I cast to an array here, it works.
    _locationsByRegion.Add(regionId, LocationIdsIds);
}

This code is meant to create a a dictionary with my "region ids" as keys and lists of "location ids" as values.

However, what actually happens is that I get a dictionary with the "region ids" as keys, but the value for each key is identical: it is the list of locations for the last region id in regionIds!

It looks like this is a product of how lambda expressions are evaluated. I can get the correct result by casting the list of location ids to an array, but this feels like a kludge.

What is a good practice for handling this situation?

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No, it's a side product - an at times immensely useful side product - of how closures capture variables. –  delnan Jul 22 '11 at 18:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're using LINQ. You need to perform an eager operation to make it perform the .Select. ToList() is a good operator to do that. List is generic it can be assign to IEnumberable directly.

In the case where you're using LINQ it does lazy evaluation by default. ToList/eager operations force the select to occur. Before you use one of these operators the action is not performed. It is like executing SQL in ADO.NET kind of. If you have the statement "Select * from users" that doesn't actually perform the query until you do extra stuff. The ToList makes the select execute.

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What is a greedy operator? –  Daniel Allen Langdon Jul 22 '11 at 18:43
    
@Rice it means any operation that will enumerate the set, ToArray, ToList, ect. –  asawyer Jul 22 '11 at 18:44
    
In the case where you're using LINQ it does lazy evaluation by default. ToList/greedy operations force the select to occur. Before you use one of these operators the action is not performed. It is like executing SQL in ADO.NET kind of. If you have the statement "Select * from users" that doesn't actually perform the query until you do extra stuff. The ToList makes the select execute. –  m4tt1mus Jul 22 '11 at 18:48
4  
"Greedy" is misleading; one normally thinks of a "greedy" operation as one that uses a "greedy algorithm" in its operation; that is, an algorithm that attempts to optimize its behaviour by computing the local, not global, optimal behaviour. If you're trying to succinctly describe the opposite of a "lazy" or "deferred" computation, prefer "eager" to "greedy". –  Eric Lippert Jul 22 '11 at 20:59
1  
@Rice Flour Cookies: See blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/11/12/… for the terrible details. –  Eric Lippert Jul 22 '11 at 22:16

Your closing over the variable, not the value.

Make a local copy of the variable so you capture the current value from the foreach loop instead:

_locationsByRegion = new Dictionary<string, IEnumerable<string>>();
foreach (string regionId in regionIds)
{
    var regionToUpper = regionId.ToUpper();
    IEnumerable<string> locationIds = Locations
        .Where(location => location.regionId.ToUpper() == regionToUpper)
        .Select(location => location.LocationId); //If I cast to an array here, it works.
    _locationsByRegion.Add(regionId, LocationIdsIds);
}

Then read this:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vcsharp/hh264182

edit - Forcing a eager evaluation would also work as others have suggested, but most of the time eager evaluations end up being much slower.

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This way you still have lazy evaluation. I can't know for sure, but in most cases it is just additional complexity. Moreover, if calculating has some side-effects - you could easily trigger them when viewing values in the debugger. If you don't need lazy evaluation - don't use it. Well, the question also was about getting lambda evaluated early. It's not what you suggested here. –  Ivan Danilov Jul 22 '11 at 18:49
    
@Ivan The poster wants to evaluate early to fix the 'weirdness' I was pointing out why he was seeing this so he can understand exactly what is going on with he behavior he is seeing. –  asawyer Jul 22 '11 at 18:51
    
I didn't say it is -1. Just clarified that most probably OP needs eager evaluation, not correct closure. Even if correct closure works, um... correctly :) –  Ivan Danilov Jul 22 '11 at 18:53
    
Thanks for the informative link! –  Daniel Allen Langdon Jul 22 '11 at 19:02
    
THIS! +1. Don't evaluate early if you don't have to. –  Joel Coehoorn Jul 22 '11 at 21:06

Call ToList() or ToArray() after the Select(...). Thus entire collection will be evaluated right there.

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As I mentioned in my question, I try calling ToArray() and then immediately casting it back to an enumerable, but that feels like a kludge. Is there a better way? –  Daniel Allen Langdon Jul 22 '11 at 18:40
    
@Rice Flour Cookies and like he said, use ToList() it is an IEnumerable and therefor there is no recasting. –  m4tt1mus Jul 22 '11 at 18:41
1  
Well, ToArray() is also IEnumerable. It is just not IEnumerable<T>. But the List<T> is IEnumerable<T>. So ToList() will be ok. –  Ivan Danilov Jul 22 '11 at 18:47
    
Yeah forgot to add the generic to it. Thanks for clearing that up @Ivan Danilov –  m4tt1mus Jul 22 '11 at 20:17

Actually the question is about lookup creation, which could be achieved simpler with standard LINQ group join:

var query = from regionId in regionIds
            join location in Locations
            on regionId.ToLower() equals location.regionId.ToLower() into g
            select new { RegionID = regionId, 
                         Locations = g.Select(location => location.LocationId) };

In this case all locations will be downloaded at once, and grouped in-memory. Also this query will not be executed until you try to access results, or until you convert it to dictionary:

var locationsByRegion = query.ToDictionary(x => x.RegionID, x => x.Locations);
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