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A) suppose a table. that i want to perform a DELETE function on . This is done in ms access 2003 sql query. NOTE There are many many many many entries. in the few hundred thousand ... to million ranges.so hopefully if there can be a code that deals well with a large dataset. there is 3 types of mood only.

 DayNumber   Mood
     1       Mad
     2       Sad
     2       Happy 
     2       Sad
     3       Sad 
     3       Happy

when there are a few moods in one day we only want to keep the most important one. so lets have a delete function delete for duplicates of days . first deleting the less important moods. importance of moods is Happy>Mad>Sad. So I want:

 DayNumber   Mood
     1       Mad
     2       Happy
     3       Happy 

B) I was first starting at easier without three options for mood jsut two . where Happy>Sad

 DayNumber   Mood
     1       Sad
     2       Sad
     2       Happy 
     3       Sad 
     3       Happy

Where I will Ideally get

 DayNumber   Mood
     1       Sad
     2       Happy 
     3       Happy

It doesnt matter whether you do the first example or secodn for me I'm stuck either way !

This is what i have for the second question so far.. btu it doesnt work cuz i have an aggregate function in the where clause .

DELETE FROM Table
WHERE (Mood='Sad') and (COUNT(DayNumber)=2);
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you have a small & fixed number of moods, you can hardwire the hierarchy like so:

DELETE FROM Table a
WHERE
(a.Mood='Sad' 
AND EXISTS
  (SELECT 1
   FROM Table b
   WHERE b.DayNumber = a.DayNumber
   AND b.Mood in ('Happy','Mad')))
OR
(a.Mood = 'Mad'
AND EXISTS
  (SELECT 1
   FROM Table c
   WHERE c.DayNumber = a.DayNumber
   AND c.Mood = 'Happy')))
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! i hadnt even had a clue before how to do the 3 moods ! jsut a random question. is it possible to have an ORDER BY in a DELETE ? jsut if i want it ordered a certain way after the delete function runs thru so i dont have to make anotehr query jsut for ordering – Chaostryder Jul 22 '11 at 19:26
    
Also what should i do if i have a very large number of entries. liek in the few hundred thousand range – Chaostryder Jul 22 '11 at 20:06
1  
No, the DELETE statement doesn't support ORDER BY. You'll have to SELECT the rows you're interested in afterward, and only then can you use ORDER BY. – dmc Jul 22 '11 at 21:13
    
When you say "large number of entries" do you mean more than three moods? If it's just a few more, you can add additional OR sections. – dmc Jul 22 '11 at 21:16
1  
Good question! The answer depends on a lot of factors, unfortunately. A common way to improve query performance is to consider creating an index. In this case I'd try creating an index that includes the Mood and DayNumber columns. Unfortunately, Access doesn't give you a query analyzer that helps you make these sorts of decisions. So it's a bit of a crap-shoot, I'm afraid. Good luck! – dmc Jul 22 '11 at 21:34
DELETE FROM Table where Mood='Sad' AND DayNumber IN (SELECT DayNumber FROM Table WHERE Mood = 'Happy')
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you this is simple and nice – Chaostryder Jul 22 '11 at 19:24

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