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I'm copying data from a table to an other one. I'm wondering what would be better to maintain data integrity and performance.

Steps :

  1. copy data older than x days from log to archive
  2. remove data from log if it exist in archive

From

INSERT INTO archive
    SELECT * FROM logs
    WHERE datediff(day, logs.timestamp, GetDate()) > @day

DELETE logsf FROM logs As logsf
    INNER JOIN archive as archivef ON logsf.uuid = archivef.uuid
    WHERE datediff(day, logsf.timestamp, GetDate()) > @jour        

To

INSERT INTO archive
    SELECT * FROM logs
    WHERE datediff(day, logs.timestamp, GetDate()) > @day
    AND NOT EXISTS (
        SELECT * FROM archive
        WHERE datediff(day, logs.timestamp, GetDate()) > @day
    )


DELETE logsf FROM logs As logsf
    INNER JOIN archive as archivef ON logsf.uuid = archivef.uuid
    WHERE datediff(day, logsf.timestamp, GetDate()) > @jour       
  1. Is this a good thing to do to ensure you are not trying to insert already existing data in a table?
  2. If my 2 original query are within a transaction, is my 2nd option pointless (and adding useless processing time)?

Which one would you use :

Insert if not exist + Delete if exist (independance)
or
Insert and delete if no error (transaction)
or
combine both

and why?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

With SQL Server you can use the output clause to put the deleted items directly into the archive table:

DELETE logs
    OUTPUT deleted.* INTO archive
    WHERE datediff(day, timestamp, GetDate()) > @jour  
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Thanks, I went with this suggestion and ended up with a very short query :) (however, the syntax seems to be DELETE logs OUTPUT deleted.* INTO archives FROM logs WHERE datediff(day, logs.timestamp, GetDate()) > @jour ( output come before from)) –  Kraz Jul 25 '11 at 14:32
    
Sorry. I have been doing too many merge statements and OUTPUT goes at the end of MERGE statements :/ The response has been updated. –  lambacck Jul 25 '11 at 17:21

I would go with option 2 because it would be a faster process since the SQL is less complex.

I prefer the idea of wrapping it in a transaction so that a roll-back will occur in case of any errors.

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