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I have 2 classes. Let's call them class A and class B. Class A contains a method that executes some action. Class B overrides this method with its own version, but does make a super call to that method in class A to perform an action. Right now, this is working fine. However, there are some actions in class A that should only be executed if the object is only an instance of class A. Put another way, some actions in the Class A method should not happen if the object is an instance of a child of Class A.

Currently, I'm using instanceof to check for each child, but I need to specify each child class, so if a new child is added at a later date, this method needs to be updated. What I would like is a dynamic way of determining if the object is a child class.

Are there any good alternatives, or is instanceof the way to go?

public class A{

    public void someMethod(){

        // Only perform these actions if it is not a child class.  This is what
        // I am looking for a better solution for
        if(!(this instanceof B)){
            // Some action...
        }

        // Actions to execute for every call
    }
}

public class B extends A{

   @Override
   public void someMethod(){

       super.someMethod();

       // More actions
   }
}

Just as an explanation of the design, I am using it to generate XML. In the program, I have a List<A> to store the data. When it is time to output the XML, I loop through the list and call generateXML (the someMethod takes its places in my example).

When an object of class A is created, it needs to have its data within <A></A> tags. When an object of class B is created, it needs to have its data within <B></B> tags. But all the properties of A must also be inside the <B></B> tags, so as of right now it calls the same generateXML method used when an object is only of of Class A

But as some others have pointed out, calling that same method isn't the way to go. Class B should be calling a protected method in class A that only generates the necessary information.

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8 Answers 8

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Create protected methods that do the class-specific things, and call them from someMethod(). Class A will provide its implementation, and if a subclass needs to effectively remove that code, then it can override the protected method with an empty implementation.

Don't fight polymorphism; use it to your advantage.

Example:

public class A {
    protected void someOtherMethod() {
        // Do stuff specific to A here.
    }

    public void someMethod() {
        // Do some stuff

        someOtherMethod();

        // Do some more stuff
    }
}

public class B extends A {
    @Override
    protected void someOtherMethod() {
        // Empty implementation; B doesn't need to do this.
        // Or do stuff specific to B...
    }
}
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Right, this method makes a lot more sense. Although I updated my post with more info, the idea still applies. Thanks! –  compuguru Jul 22 '11 at 20:34
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Well now that's a horrible design and should be solved in a different way (eg make the part that is called from the subclass a own protected method), but alas if you really need it you can check for

this.getClass() == A.class to see if the class is really identical.

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3  
I want to give +1 but I cannot possibly encourage the OP's poor design. It really needs to be reworked. –  Perception Jul 22 '11 at 20:08
1  
Yeah it's really an ugly hack (just as instanceof is in most cases) and is easily solved in a different way most of the time. The only real excuse would be as a backcomp hack if he has only control over the parent class and not the children (but even then that's contrived). –  Voo Jul 22 '11 at 20:13
    
Well, you get +1 for mentioning backwards compat! –  Perception Jul 22 '11 at 20:17
    
I personally hope that cdhowie's answer "wins" - I'd feel really bad otherwise :x –  Voo Jul 22 '11 at 20:25
    
I didn't even think of using a different method, that does make it a lot simpler. Thanks for the suggestion. And yes, I did accept cdhowie's answer :) –  compuguru Jul 22 '11 at 20:36
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I see instanceof as an opportunity to use polymorphism.

Keep behavior in someMethod common to all types of A. Subclass A to implement behavior you're currently checking for with the instanecof.

public class A{

    public void someMethod(){

        // Get rid of the special section and put it in it's own class
        // Keep only agnostic behavior common to all types of A
        // Actions to execute for every call
    }
}

public class B extends A{

   @Override
   public void someMethod(){

       super.someMethod();

       // More actions
   }
}

public class C extends A{

   @Override
   public void someMethod(){
       super.someMethod();

       // Actions that were originally in the if(instanceof) check
   }
}
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Why not

public class A{

public void someMethod(){

    // Only perform these actions if it is not a child class.  This is what
    // I am looking for a better solution for
    if(this.getClass().equals(A.class))
        // Some action...
    }

    // Actions to execute for every call
}

}

public class B extends A{

@Override public void someMethod(){

   super.someMethod();

   // More actions

} }

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Expression A.class.equals(this.getClass()) returns true only if this is really the instance of class A. If it is child instance the result will be false.

BUT: if you have to do this check your design. It sounds very not object oriented style. I can give you an alternative. Separate your base class A onto 2: the really base class A0 and its child A1. Your class B will be the brother of A1 and will extend directly from A0.

In this case you can put the common code into class A0 and all specific code (that in your version must be executed only if the class is exactly A and not its subclass) to A1.

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"call super" is an anti-pattern. Instead of expecting the subclass to invoke superclass functionality, turn it the other way around. Now the superclass has complete control of what's called both before and after the "common" stuff.

public class A {
    public void someMethod() {
        beforeCommonStuff();
        // Actions to execute for every call
        afterCommonStuff();
    }

    protected void beforeCommonStuff() {
        // Actions to execute only for class A
    }

    protected void afterCommonStuff() {}
}

public class B extends A {
    @Override
    protected void afterCommonStuff(){
        // More actions
    }
}
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This would be the Template method design pattern and the someMethod() method in class A should be marked as final for the pattern to be effective. –  Jeshurun Jul 22 '11 at 23:16
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This may be the same as what cdhowie was trying to say. (No offense: I thought you were a little unclear.)

Don't use instanceof. Instead, create methods that return flags or other appropriate values for the given type.

Your example doesn't give any details of what you're trying to do, so I'll just invent something.

!!! Wrong way !!!

public class Car
{
  public void goUphill()
  {
    // XYZ has automatic transmission -- don't need to downshift
    if (!(this instanceof XYZ())
    {
      downshift();
    }
    pressGas();
  }
}

public class ModelXYZCar extends Car
{
  public void goUphill()
  {
    tellWifeToGetOutAndPush();
    super.goUphill();
  }
}

Better way:

public class Car
{
  public boolean isManualTransmission()
  {
    // default
    return true;
  }
  public void goUphill()
  {
    if (isManualTransmission())
    {
      downshift();
    }
    pressGas();
  }
}

public class ModelXYZCar extends Car
{
  public boolean isManualTransmission()
  {
    return false;
  }
  public void goUphill()
  {
    tellWifeToGetOutAndPush();
    super.goUphill();
  }
}

This way, the super class doesn't have to know what the subclasses need. Each subclass defines its own behavior. In this case, each subclass defines an isManualTransmission function and returns true or false as appropriate.

Better still is to avoid the need for flags and put the appropriate behavior in each class:

abstract public class Car
{
  abstract public void downshift();
  public void goUphill()
  {
    downshift();
    pressGas();
  }
}

public class AutomaticTransmissionCar extends Car
{
  public void downshift()
  {
    // Automatic transmission -- no need to do anything
  }
}
public class ManualTransmissionCar extends Car
{
  public void downshift()
  {
    ... whatever ...
  }
}
public class ModelXYZCar extends ManualTransmissionCar
{
  public void goUphill()
  {
    tellWifeToGetOutAndPush();
    super.goUphill();
  }
}
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I could be mistaken, but your case seems like the ideal scenario to "favour composition over inheritance" and "encapsulate what varies". One general course of action in a situation like yours is to:

  1. Not have your subclasses extend from the superclass
  2. Isolate the section of code that should only belong to A in a private method.
  3. Create an instance of A in B, C, etc and call A.someMethod().

    public class A {
        public void someMethod(){}
        private void someOtherMethod(){
            // move behavior specific to A in here.
        }       
    }
    
    public class B { // no extends
        public void someMethod() {
            new A().someMethod();
        }
    }
    

Again, I could be wrong and this might not apply to your case.

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