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If I use socket.makefile and then close the file object as well as the underlying socket, then subsequent calls to read will throw an exception, just as I'd want it to. For example, the following code works as I'd expect:

import socket
from time import sleep
from threading import Thread

ADDR = ("localhost", 4321)

def listener(sock):
    client,addr = sock.accept()
    sleep(1)
    client.close()
    sock.close()

server_sock = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
server_sock.setsockopt(socket.SOL_SOCKET, socket.SO_REUSEADDR, 1)
server_sock.bind(ADDR)
server_sock.listen(1)
Thread(target=listener, args=[server_sock]).start()

sock = socket.create_connection(ADDR)
f = sock.makefile("r+b", bufsize=0)

f.close()
sock.close()
f.read(8)    # throws an exception, as I'd expect

However, if I make a call to read while the file/socket are still open then that call will block, and then if I close the socket, the read method still doesn't return. In fact, it hangs indefinitely until the socket is closed on the other end. The following code demonstrates this distressing behavior:

import socket
from time import sleep
from threading import Thread

ADDR = ("localhost", 4321)

def reader(f):
    print("about to read")
    print("we read %r" % f.read(8))
    print("finished reading")

def listener(sock):
    client, addr = sock.accept()
    sleep(3)
    client.close()
    sock.close()

server_sock = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
server_sock.setsockopt(socket.SOL_SOCKET, socket.SO_REUSEADDR, 1)
server_sock.bind(ADDR)
server_sock.listen(1)
Thread(target=listener, args=[server_sock]).start()

sock = socket.create_connection(ADDR)
f = sock.makefile("r+b", bufsize=0)
Thread(target=reader, args=[f]).start()

sleep(1)
print("closing pseudo-file and socket")
f.close()
sock.close()
sleep(1)
print("we still haven't finished reading!")

This is a serious problem for me, since I'd like to make a blocking call to f.read in a thread, but then still be able to close the socket and have the thread return from that call (possibly by throwing an exception) and exit. However, all that happens is that the call blocks forever so long as the other side never closes the socket.

So is there any way for Thread1 to call read on the file-like object created by socket.makefile and then have Thread2 shut down the socket in a way that causes Thread1 to stop blocking on its read call?

EDIT: I tried re-writing my program to entirely use gevent and its socket and Greenlet approach to multithreading, but my program still does exactly the same thing:

from gevent import sleep, socket, spawn

ADDR = ("localhost", 4321)

def reader(f):
    print("about to read")
    print("we read %r" % f.read(8))
    print("finished reading")

def listener(sock):
    client, addr = sock.accept()
    sleep(3)
    client.close()
    sock.close()

server_sock = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
server_sock.setsockopt(socket.SOL_SOCKET, socket.SO_REUSEADDR, 1)
server_sock.bind(ADDR)
server_sock.listen(1)
spawn(listener, server_sock)

sock = socket.create_connection(ADDR)
f = sock.makefile("r+b", bufsize=0)
spawn(reader, f)

sleep(1)
print("closing pseudo-file and socket")
f.close()
sock.close()

sleep(1)
print("we still haven't finished reading!")
sleep(2)

I was surprised to learn that even using gevent sockets, calls to read will block even after the underlying socket is closed. If there's no way to prevent this, I'll probably just have to accept Thomas' depressing "this is not possible" answer :(

share|improve this question
    
Is there no way of "locking", so to speak, the socket until reads have completed and returned? Or do you not want to allow that behavior? –  JAB Jul 22 '11 at 20:38
    
@JAB: I'd like to be say f.read(n) in Thread-X and know that if Thread-Y closes the socket/file objects that my call to f.read(n) will throw an exception or return or do anything other than block forever. If I don't have this guarantee, then f.read is basically worthless to me except when it happens inside a select loop. –  Eli Courtwright Jul 29 '11 at 19:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, threads have distressing behaviour, especially when touching things like sockets from multiple threads at the same time. This is not something you can make work right. There is no way to force a thread that's blocked in a read to break out of the read or terminate -- closing the socket from under it is more likely to cause your entire program to segfault (or worse) than it is to do what you want.

The right way to deal with situations like this is to use non-blocking reads, instead. A decent event framework, like Twisted, can help you with this.

share|improve this answer
1  
Well, it depends on the OS. On Windows, closing the socket from another thread causes the read to return with an error, (or exception if accesed via. some libs). Ths happens with every Windows version since W95 and used to work with earlier Linux as well. It seems like things have changed. If an SockedClosed error can be detected with a non-blocking read, it should be possible for a blocking read as well. AFAIK, 'non-blocking' just moves the blocking call to a kernel thread which makes/triggers callbacks after a blocking read. –  Martin James Jul 23 '11 at 0:54
    
Accessing the same thing from different threads without proper synchronization is never a good idea, not even when it 'seems to work' when you are looking. –  Thomas Wouters Jul 23 '11 at 1:33
1  
The tx and rx streams are independent and safe to write/read from different threads, so it would be inconsistent/unmanageable if a socket close was not safely available from different threads, (with appropriate notifications, (error return/exception). If this functionality was not available and safe, which thread would one close the socket from? My apps have been looking for decades without problems, (OK, mostly Windows). –  Martin James Jul 23 '11 at 9:55

In situations like this, I've had success using eventlet and nowadays, gevent is doing the same types of things:

'monkey patching' the socket library to use non blocking I/O. Here's an example of what you could try:

>>> from gevent import monkey; monkey.patch_socket()
>>> import socket

and see how that'd affect your results

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, gevent sockets won't work in a multithreaded system, so they won't work for my particular use case, but I'll definitely keep this in mind in the future when looking for a happy middle-ground between threading and Twisted. –  Eli Courtwright Jul 22 '11 at 20:37
1  
gevent.monkey.patch_all() will make Thread greenlet-based, so gevent sockets will work here. If you really need OS threads, gevent 1.0 supports multiple OS threads and will start a new Hub/reactor in each one. –  Denis Bilenko Jul 23 '11 at 18:08
    
@Denis: I've edited my question with my test program re-written to use gevent, and I still can't seem to avoid this same behavior. Is there a better way to use gevent than the approach I'm taking? –  Eli Courtwright Jul 26 '11 at 18:28
    
@Eli I ran your gevent script with gevent 1.0dev on linux and got this output: 1) about to read 2) closing pseudo-file and socket 3) we still haven't finished reading! 4) we read "" 5) finished reading This means that read() did return after all. Is that what you expect? Do you get different results? –  Denis Bilenko Jul 29 '11 at 10:02
    
@Denis: I get the same results, but what those results demonstrate is that closing the underlying socket and file objects do not cause the read to return - that only happens when the remote socket is closed. So if the remote socket never closes, then the call to read will hang forever. You can simulate this by replacing the sleep(3) in listener with a sleep(99999) - the read will not return at all (or at least not for 99999 seconds) even after the socket and file objects have been closed. –  Eli Courtwright Jul 29 '11 at 19:35

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