Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a list that prints out weather data for a year. The data is listed by month and I need to find the yearly totals after the list is sorted. I used the list.sort() function to sort the list by month. From there, I need to print a specific element of data, but I'm unsure how to do so. here's an example of the unsorted list:

Weather data:
Month    temp    rainfall
 2        60       2.0    
 4        75       3.4
 1        50       1.5

How do I print out a specific temp, or rainfall? In this case, max temp = 75. This the how I used the list.sort():

// ListNode class not included
bool shift_Months( ListNode M1, ListNode M2 )
{
     if( M1.getMonth() < M2.getMonth() ) return true;
     return false;
}
int main ()
{
     ListNode M;
     list<ListNode> Mlist;
     list<ListNode>::iterator p;
     int i;

     Mlist.sort( shift_Months );
     for( i=0,p=Mlist.begin(); i<Mlist.size()-1; i++,p++ )
         cout << *p;

     return 0;
 }

I was thinking of sorting the list by whatever I need to get. For example, sort by temp, and display the last temp. I don't know how to display only the temp without displaying the rest of the list.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I was thinking of sorting the list by whatever I need to get. For example, sort by temp, and display the last temp.

Sorting is slow. Sorting just to perform analysis on data is baaad.

Why not track maxima and minima as you add items to the list? Perhaps with a wrapper class.

If this is not feasible for whatever reason (and you can live with O(n) lookup), you can do a search through the list for the record with the values that you're looking for, but I still wouldn't go modifying the original data for this.

I don't know how to display only the temp without displaying the rest of the list.

We would need to know what ListNode looks like in order to give an exact answer, but I think that you are looking for something like cout << p->getTemp();.

share|improve this answer

First of all, you probably should not use an std::list for this. You're not showing anything to indicate that it's a good choice, and absent a specific indication in its direction, std::list is usually about last choice of containers to use. For that matter, even when you think you do have a specific indication in its directly, chances are still pretty good that it's a mediocre to poor choice.

Second, to get the minimum or maximum value, you normally just want to use std::min_element or std::max_element respectively:

struct by_month { 
    bool operator()(ListNode const &a, ListNode const &b) { 
        return a.GetMonth() < b.GetMonth();
    }
};

std::vector<ListNode> data;

std::cout << std::max_element(data.begin(), data.end(), by_month());
share|improve this answer
    
+1: Yep, good idea. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 22 '11 at 23:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.