Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have

public interface IFoo
{
   IEnumerable<IThingy> Thingies{get;}
}

I want to then be able to do

class Thing1 : IThingy
{
   ...
}
class ImplementFoo : IFoo
{
   List<Thing1> m_things;
   IEnumerable<IThingy> Thingies {get {return m_things;}}
}

ImplementFoo.Thingies returns an IList (which is an IEnumerable) of Thing1s (which are IThings). So in theory this code should work, but it does not. VS suggests a cast in the getter; that compiles but fails at run time. Am I expecting too much of covariance in c# 4?

VS 2010 -> Silverlight 4. Here's the compile error

Cannot implicitly convert type 'System.Collections.Generic.List<MyProj.Column>' to 'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<MyProj.IColumn>'. An explicit conversion exists (are you missing a cast?)

EDIT: People tell me this should work, but it doesnt work in SL4

share|improve this question
    
Are you targeting .NET 4 in your project? –  Reed Copsey Jul 22 '11 at 23:33
    
.net 4 for sure. LEt me try again. Actually Silverlight 4 –  pm100 Jul 22 '11 at 23:51

3 Answers 3

This works fine in C#/.NET 4. Here is a full, compiling and working sample:

namespace Test
{
    using System;
    using System.Collections.Generic;
    using System.Linq;

    public interface IThingy { }

    public interface IFoo
    {
        IEnumerable<IThingy> Thingies { get; }
    }

    internal class Thing1 : IThingy { }

    internal class ImplementFoo : IFoo
    {
        private List<Thing1> m_things = new List<Thing1>() { new Thing1() };

        public IEnumerable<IThingy> Thingies
        {
            get { return m_things; }
        }
    }

    internal class Program
    {
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var impl = new ImplementFoo();

            Console.WriteLine(impl.Thingies.Count());


            Console.WriteLine("Press any key to exit");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}

I suspect the problem is you're targeting .NET 3.5sp1 or earlier, not .NET 4.0. Covariance will only work properly when targeting .NET 4, as it requires the new framework changes. In this case, IEnumerable<T>, in .NET 4, is actually IEnumerable<out T>, which is required for this to work.

share|improve this answer
    
That explains why it wasn't working for me, I was testing with ICollection<> and Collection<>. Seems ICollection is not out T. –  Anthony Sottile Jul 22 '11 at 23:41
3  
@Anthony: ICollection<T> has methods which take a T as input. If you have a collection of Bananas, and you can treat it as a collection of Fruit, then you can put an Orange into a collection of Bananas. That shouldn't be legal, so the collection interface is not allowed to be covariant in T. –  Eric Lippert Jul 22 '11 at 23:45
    
@Anthony Sottile Yes, that's correct. ICollection isn't one of the interfaces that was made co/contra-variant in 4.0. –  csano Jul 22 '11 at 23:46
    
@Eric makes sense now. Guess I should have thought about the implications of being an editable collection, now my comment just sounds stupid :P –  Anthony Sottile Jul 22 '11 at 23:48
    
@Anthony: No worries; this stuff is tricky to get your brain around! –  Eric Lippert Jul 23 '11 at 0:23

You can use the Cast extension method:

class ImplementFoo : IFoo
{
    List<Thing1> m_things;

    IEnumerable<IThingy> Thingies 
    {
        get
        {
            return m_things.Cast<IThingy>();
        }
    }
}

This is because IEnumerable<Thing1> does not implicitly implement IEnumerable<IThingy>.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm, looking at Reed's answer, then perhaps I'm giving a pre-.NET 4 answer here... –  Reddog Jul 22 '11 at 23:27
1  
This actually does work in .NET 4. See: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee207183.aspx –  Reed Copsey Jul 22 '11 at 23:28
    
Nice! I hadn't noticed this new feature, I've become accustomed to just tacking on the cast call... msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd465120.aspx –  Reddog Jul 22 '11 at 23:32
up vote 0 down vote accepted

THis is a difference between SL4 and CLR4. THe IEnumerable interface is not marked 'out'. Apparently fixed in SL5

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.