Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to create a simple voucher program.

Client connects to server and asks if a voucher has time left on it, if yes the server responds with how much time.

I have control of the server and the clients, the client side is coded by me as well.

Right now this is what I have for my server side, the client side is self explanatory.

The big flaw in this, is that if 2 clients connect with the same voucher code, they will both have access because the server is not checking if there is an active client with that code.

Could anyone explain or lead to documentation in how this is possible ?

#!/usr/bin/env python

from twisted.internet import reactor, protocol

class Responder(protocol.Protocol):

    def dataReceived(self, data):
        # check the voucher code, and return disabled if its out of time or not there. Otherwise return time left.
        if data.startswith("check="):
            param, vcode = data.split("=")
            checkcode = SQLConnect("check", vcode, vcode)
            if checkcode == "disabled":
                self.transport.write("disabled")
            else:
                self.transport.write(str(checkcode))
        # Update time left.
        if data.startswith("update="):
            param, vcode, vtime = data.split("=")
            SQLConnect("update", vcode, vtime)

def main():
    factory = protocol.ServerFactory()
    factory.protocol = Responder
    reactor.listenTCP(6500,factory)
    reactor.run()

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()
share|improve this question
    
What does "active" mean? Your question seems very dependent on that. –  Jean-Paul Calderone Jul 23 '11 at 1:02
    
these client connect to the server to get a timer, so a countdown where they are active. I can keep the clients connected during the countdown. When the timer is done they disconnect and that voucher code is then invalid. –  Axlrod Jul 23 '11 at 2:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If a voucher becomes "in use" when a client checks it and then becomes unused when the client disconnects, it sounds like you just need to keep a set of vouchers which you add to when the check is done and remove from when the client disconnects. You could keep this on the factory so it is shared between all client connections. For example:

#!/usr/bin/env python

from twisted.internet import reactor, protocol

class Responder(protocol.Protocol):
    def connectionMade(self):
        self.vcode = None

    def dataReceived(self, data):
        # check the voucher code, and return disabled if its out of time or not there. Otherwise return time left.
        if data.startswith("check="):
            param, vcode = data.split("=")
            if vcode in self.factory.activeVouchers:
                self.transport.write("in use")
                return
            self.factory.activeVouchers.add(vcode)
            self.vcode = vcode

            checkcode = SQLConnect("check", vcode, vcode)
            if checkcode == "disabled":
                self.transport.write("disabled")
            else:
                self.transport.write(str(checkcode))
        # Update time left.
        if data.startswith("update="):
            param, vcode, vtime = data.split("=")
            SQLConnect("update", vcode, vtime)

    def connectionLost(self, reason):
        if self.vcode is not None:
            self.factory.activeVouchers.remove(self.vcode)

def main():
    factory = protocol.ServerFactory()
    factory.activeVouchers = set()
    factory.protocol = Responder
    reactor.listenTCP(6500,factory)
    reactor.run()

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

The new vcode attribute on Responder lets the activeVouchers set get updated when the client disconnects (which triggers the Responder.connectionLost call). The additional check near the beginning of Responder.dataReceived adds vouchers to that set when they become used and prevents any in use voucher from being claimed.

Apart from that, there are a couple other things you might want to consider. First, you should probably use twisted.protocols.basic.LineOnlyReceiver or one of the other protocols in twisted.protocols.basic instead of just Protocol. dataReceived is called whenever any bytes are received over the network. Since TCP is a stream-oriented transport rather than a message-oriented transported, you may end up with a call like dataReceived("chec") quickly followed by dataReceived("k=somecode"). As your dataReceived is implemented now, this case won't be handled and the client will receive no response. LineOnlyReceiver adds line-based framing, so that bytes like "check=somecode\r\n" can be interpreted as a complete message and "check=somecode" delivered all at once, in a single lineReceived call.

Second, SQLConnect looks like it probably performs some blocking I/O. If this is true, it means that your server won't handle concurrent client requests very well, since any blocking prevents all new events from being handled, including those from different clients. You might want to take a look at twisted.enterprise.adbapi for a non-blocking SQL API.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah I used pymysql in my sqlconnect, which blocks. thanks for the answer I will go trough it when I get up tomorrow. I like your idea and will try it out. I have only been using twisted for a couple of days, so appreciate your input. I did see that twisted had SQL capabilities so I might try my luck with it. This will initially serve 20 clients, but can quickly go in the hundreds. –  Axlrod Jul 25 '11 at 3:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.