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For example, here are two ways to set an integer variable (say C++):

int x = 0xFF;
int y = 255;

Which statement would compile faster to set the actual bits to the integer value?

Edited: *compile changed from execute. I assumed the conversion to binary was at execution time, but seems to be at compile time given @muntoo's answer

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There is absolutely no difference in execution time, and probably no difference in compilation speed.

Added in response to comment:
Here's what happens. The compiler has a parser, probably recursive-descent, and at bottom it calls a lexer to get tokens. In this case the token after = is a number, which it can tell by the leading digit, so it goes something like this, where pc is a pointer to the current character:

if (isdigit(*pc)){
  intpart = 0;
  if (pc[0]=='0' && pc[1]=='x'){
    pc += 2;
    while(ishexdigit(*pc)){
      intpart *= 16;
      if (isdigit(*pc)){
        intpart += (*pc - '0')
      }
      else {
        intpart += (tolower(*pc) - 'a' + 10);
      }
      pc++;
    }
  }
  else {
    while(isdigit(*pc)){
      intpart *= 10;
      intpart += (*pc - '0');
      pc++;
    }
    if (*pc == '.'){
      // ... handle fractional part
    }
  }
}

Anyway, as you can see, it's a pretty tight loop that does isdigit or ishexdigit or tolower once or twice for each character in the number, and multiplication, subtraction, and addition. Assuming those functions are in-line, we're talking maybe 10-20 instructions per character. It's maybe slightly more instructions per character in the hex case, but the decimal number will have somewhat more characters, so it's hard to tell a-priori which should be faster. This only happens for the total number of such integers you had the energy to type in your code, like maybe around a 100. If the machine can do, say, 10^8 instructions per second, it can read digits at the rate of around 10^7 per second, or around 100 nanoseconds per character, or 10 microseconds for all the numbers in your file, give or take an order of magnitude.

Once the compiler knows it's a number, it just becomes part of the abstract syntax tree, which is used to generate assembly language. By that time, the fact that it was hexadecimal or decimal has long since been forgotten. All it knows is it's a binary integer of a certain value, so the assembly language will be identical.

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2  
There probably is a difference in compilation speed, though an insignificant one. :-) –  MRAB Jul 23 '11 at 1:52
1  
The extra char might cause an extra page fault :) –  Martin James Jul 23 '11 at 9:39
    
@Mike At time of execution, won't the program go different processing routes, in order to store the value in memory: One converting hex to binary, and the other converting decimal to binary? If so, one way should definitely be faster, even if its extremely minute with today's computers –  Shredder Jul 24 '11 at 15:00
    
@Mike I guess I meant "At compile time", please see my edited question >_< Thx –  Shredder Jul 24 '11 at 15:13
    
Wow! Thanks for the great answer/code. Took me a min to digest it, but once I did, I was amazed~ +10 if I could..Thx again! :) –  Shredder Jul 25 '11 at 21:53

0xFF is the same as 255, in the point of view of your compiler. Both will generate exactly the same code. Your compiler "converts" them both to 11111111b.


Compilation speed all depends on the compiler and how it compiles.

For example 0xFF could be identified as a hexadecimal number (ignoring regexes, which would be the preferred method):

bool myishex(string sz)
{
    if(sz[0] == '0' && sz[1] == 'x')
    {
        for(size_t i = 2; i < sz.length(); ++i)
            if(!(sz[i] >= '0' && sz[i] <= '9') || !(sz[i] >= 'A' && sz[i] <= 'F') || !(sz[i] >= 'a' && sz[i] <= 'f'))
                return(false);
    }
    else
    {
        return(false);
    }

    return(true);
}

Compared to myisnum():

bool myisnum(string sz)
{
    for(size_t i = 0; i < sz.length(); ++i)
        if(!(sz[i] >= '0' && sz[i] <= '9'))
            return(false);

    return(true);
}

Well, myisnum() is generally faster than myishex(). (The probability of A-F or a-f is higher than 0-9.)


But conversion from FF to a binary number may be faster slower than 255.

int myhex2bin(string sz)
{
    int b = 0;

    sz = sz.substr(2); // Cut the "0x" out.

    for(size_t i = 0; i < sz.length(); ++i)
    {
        sz[i] = tolower(sz[i]);
        b += myhexdigit2dec(sz[i]) << ((sz.length() - (i + 1)) << 2);
    }

    return(b);
}

// Unsafe. Optimized for speed.
int myhexdigit2dec(char c)
{
    return(c < 'A' ? c - '0' : (c < 'a' ? c - 'A' + 10 : c - 'a' + 10));
}

Whereas you don't get no bitshifts in decimal to binary, but you don't get no A-F nor a-f neither.

int mydec2bin(string sz)
{
    int b = 0;
    int factor = 1;

    for(size_t i = sz.length(); i > 0; --i)
    {
        b += (sz[i - 1] - '0') * factor;
        factor *= 10;
    }

    return(b);    
}

Conclusion: Still depends on the compiler, but the 255 is probably faster to compile. :)

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I am not asking for programming practices, but out of curiosity. And I had my question wrong, I guess I meant at compile time (see my edited question). I assumed the conversion of hex/dec to binary was at execution time, but sounds like your saying it happens at compile time. And like you said, there should be a difference, regardless of the fraction of a second it takes for today's powerful computers. Its the theory that I'm interested in. Given that, do you know which is faster? –  Shredder Jul 24 '11 at 15:14

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