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I'm working on a ECG data that basically has the following schema

Col 1 = TIMESTAMP
Col 2 = PATIENTID
Col 3 = ECGVALUE

Now, I'm trying to write a SQL statement that should be able to select all the rows that satisfy the following condition

Row index >= n and TIMESTAMP of xth row <= TIMESTAMP of nth row + offset

To explaing it further, let say I've following data in my database

1.1 ANON 1.1
1.3 ANON 2.3
3.5 ANON 4.3
5.0 ANON 6.5
6.3 ANON 7.5
7.9 ANON 8
8.6 ANON 9.4

Now, I want to select the data from 3rd row till 3 seconds of data has been collected, which means that my resultset should have

3.5 ANON 2.3 *//3rd row till TIMESTAMP <= 3.5 + 3 <= 6.5*
1.3 ANON 2.3
3.5 ANON 4.3
5.0 ANON 6.5
6.3 ANON 7.5

Last two rows are neglected as difference between TIMESTAMP of first and last cannont go beyond 3. So If I go back to my condition, which is

Row index >= n and TIMESTAMP of xth row <= TIMESTAMP of nth row + offset

Here,

n: nth row from where data must be selected
x: Any arbitary row in result set
offset: Maximum difference between first and last TIMESTAMP of result set.

I've written a working SQL statement for the above condition, but I think its not that much optimized as I'm new to SQL.

SELECT TIMESTAMP, ECGVALUE
FROM
(
    SELECT TIMESTAMP, ECGVALUE, ROW_NUMBER() OVER() AS RN
    FROM EKLUND.DEV_RAWECG
)
WHERE RN >= n AND TIMESTAMP <=
(
    SELECT TIMESTAMP FROM
    (
        SELECT TIMESTAMP, ROW_NUMBER() OVER() AS TM
    )
    WHERE TM = n
) + offset;
share|improve this question
    
Are you aware that the order of rows is not guaranteed unless specified explicitly with ORDER BY? –  Andriy M Jul 23 '11 at 4:17
    
You sure? The data in database is already ordered by ASC order. –  User 104 Jul 29 '11 at 0:30
    
We are talking about the order of data as returned by the query, not about the order of data as stored physically in the database. Whatever the latter may be, it has no 100% influence on the former. The rows may be retrieved in parallel and the engine, for the sake of performance, will build the resulting set from the obtained chunks without paying attention to their particular order, in the absence of ORDER BY. –  Andriy M Jul 29 '11 at 3:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The code will look a lot cleaner if you use a common table expression, as follows:

WITH rownums(TIMESTAMP, ECGVALUE, RN) AS (
    SELECT TIMESTAMP, ECGVALUE, ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY TIMESTAMP) AS RN
    FROM EKLUND.DEV_RAWECG
)
SELECT allrows.TIMESTAMP, allrows.ECGVALUE, allrows.RN
FROM rownums allrows
     CROSS JOIN rownums rown
WHERE rown.RN = n
      AND allrows.RN >= n
      AND rown.TIMESTAMP + offset >= allrows.TIMESTAMP;
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. This is exactly what I was looking for. –  User 104 Jul 23 '11 at 22:43
    
You're welcome. Can you mark this as the answer? Thanks :) –  Derek Kromm Jul 25 '11 at 3:47

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