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I have large text files in this format and would like to do statistical analysis on these numbers, starting by adding the columns (ignoring the first line). I've tried looking at other examples and modifying them but my programming is poor! So I am wondering if someone could point me in the right direction, thanks!

AF3     F7      F3      FC5     T7      P7      O1      O2      P8      T8      FC6 
4464.62 4285.13 4503.59 4505.64 4455.9  4341.03 4257.95 4306.67 4299.49 4180    4461.54 
4473.85 4288.72 4510.26 4508.72 4455.38 4347.18 4265.64 4318.97 4310.26 4184.1  4468.21 
4474.87 4289.74 4516.92 4510.77 4450.26 4345.13 4272.82 4332.82 4312.82 4188.72 4464.62
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2  
what have you tried so far ? show us some code –  Prix Jul 23 '11 at 4:57

6 Answers 6

This is a basic script that gives you an array with the columns summed. Also keeps the headers. Output is tab delimited. Since I do not know the format of your input file, I simply split on whitespace.

Usage:

$ script.pl input.txt > output.txt

Code:

use strict;
use warnings;
use ARGV::readonly;

my @data;
my @headers = split ' ', <>;

while (<>) {
    my @row = split;
    $data[$_] += $row[$_] for (0 .. $#row);
}

$" = "\t";
print "@headers", "\n";
print "@data";

Output:

AF3     F7      F3      FC5     T7      P7      O1      O2      P8      T8
FC6
13413.34        12863.59        13530.77        13525.13        13361.54
13033.34        12796.41        12958.46        12922.57        12552.82
13394.37
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Thanks for the response, that's perfect. It gives me something solid to work on. I don't quite understand this line: $data[$_] += $row[$_] for (0 .. $#row); $data is a 2d array? I know this is the core component of the program and in rational terms I know what's happening but I'm just terrible at deciphering the logic :) –  Jay Jul 23 '11 at 7:23
    
It is a loop. for (0 .. $#row) gives a list of 0,1,2,3 .. up to the maximum element of @row. That number is placed in $_, and then the $_th element in @data is summed together with the corresponding element in @row. Both arrays have only one dimension. –  TLP Jul 23 '11 at 7:48
    
@Jay, these are some fundamental Perl idioms, to program in any language you will have to do a little reading. Try perldoc perlintro as a starting place. –  Joel Berger Jul 23 '11 at 21:43

If the sum is all you're after, then TLP's answer is solid enough.


But if the plan is to implement more statistical functions, why re-invent the wheel? CPAN is a repository of Perl modules that the community has put together. More likely than not, someone will have already written a module to perform the same functionality that you're after.

It (ideally) allows you to focus more on addressing your needs, and less on coding it up.

Although personally I am not satisfied with the Statistics modules available on CPAN, it seems that Statistics::Descriptive aptly fulfills the immediate needs of this problem.


Once upon a time, I used to be daunted by the idea of having to install a module from CPAN. Here are a few steps to get you started.

Check if module is already installed

$ perl -e 'use Statistics::Descriptive;'

If it's installed, you'll see no output. If not, Perl will complain:

Can't locate Statistics/Descriptive.pm in @INC ...

BEGIN failed--compilation aborted at -e line 1.

Install the module (if it's not there already)

$ cpan Statistics::Descriptive

Use the module (assuming the install was successful)

use strict;
use warnings;

use Statistics::Descriptive;

Note

I am against using CPAN for the simple problem outlined here; it's quite simply overkill. But the moment you start delving deeper into statistical alchemy, it may save more time than you think.

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For array manipulation Perl has PDL which is in the vein of MatLab or IDL.

Example of PDL creation and use:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use PDL;

use Scalar::Util 'looks_like_number';

# get data into proper format
# N.B. fast and dirty method
my $line_number = 0;
my @data;
while(<DATA>) {
  $line_number++;

  #ignore whitespace or empty lines
  next if /^\s*$/;

  my @line = split;

  #ignore lines with non-numeric data
  if ( grep { ! looks_like_number $_ } @line ) {
    print "line $line_number contains non-numeric data, skipping\n";
    next;
  }

  push @data, \@line;
}

#create PDL object (called piddle)
my $pdl = pdl(@data);

print "PDL:\n";
print $pdl;

print "Sum columns:\n";
#sumover acts on 0th dim, so "transpose" 0 and 1
print sumover $pdl->xchg(0,1);


__DATA__
AF3     F7      F3      FC5     T7      P7      O1      O2      P8      T8      FC6 
4464.62 4285.13 4503.59 4505.64 4455.9  4341.03 4257.95 4306.67 4299.49 4180    4461.54 
4473.85 4288.72 4510.26 4508.72 4455.38 4347.18 4265.64 4318.97 4310.26 4184.1  4468.21 
4474.87 4289.74 4516.92 4510.77 4450.26 4345.13 4272.82 4332.82 4312.82 4188.72 4464.62

Of course you would most likely be loading data from a file, so rather than looping over <DATA> you would loop over some filehandle.

Once you create the object, function, such as sumover or those in PDL::Ufunc can do the legwork for you.

On installing: I have a post on installing PDL on Ubuntu, otherwise check out the wiki.

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PDL-2.4.7 rcols can be used to read in column data, including the column IDs from the first line of the file. Then the sums can be calculated as above using the PDL sumover routine:

use strict;
use warnings;

use PDL;

my $hdr = [];
my $pdl = rcols( \*DATA, [], { colids=>$hdr } );

print "PDL:\n";
print $pdl;

print "Column IDs: @{$hdr}\n";

print "Sum columns:\n";
print sumover $pdl;


__DATA__
AF3     F7      F3      FC5     T7      P7      O1      O2      P8      T8      FC6 
4464.62 4285.13 4503.59 4505.64 4455.9  4341.03 4257.95 4306.67 4299.49 4180    4461.54 
4473.85 4288.72 4510.26 4508.72 4455.38 4347.18 4265.64 4318.97 4310.26 4184.1  4468.21 
4474.87 4289.74 4516.92 4510.77 4450.26 4345.13 4272.82 4332.82 4312.82 4188.72 4464.62

See the PDL web page for more information. The perldl mailing list is often the best way to ask questions or interact with PDL developers or the user community. Try help rcols in the pdl2 shell for documentation for all the rcols features.

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One-liner approach:

$ perl -MList::Util=sum -lane 'print sum(@F[1 .. $#F])' < data.txt

0
43596.94
43657.44
43684.62

Explanation:

  • perl: call Perl, duh;
  • -MList::Util=sum: import sum() function from the module List::Util, which is a part of the default Perl installation;
  • -lane: a short way of specifying -l -a -n -e options, where:
    • -l: enables automatic line-ending processing (strips newline character on input, appends on output);
    • -a: turns on autosplit mode (by default, split every line on word-nonword boundary and put results into the @F array);
    • -n: iterates on the input;
    • -e: code to evaluate.
  • print sum @F[1 .. $#F]: finally, the Perl code itself:
    • print: self-explanatory;
    • sum: ditto;
    • @F[1 .. $#F]: a slice from an array @F, starting with the element #1 (first element is #0) and up to the last element ($#F is the index to the last element of @F).

Observation: the first line of output is 0 because Perl evaluates non-numerical things (headers) as numerical 0.

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perl is a decent choice here, but for a simple task like that i'd always use the already available toolchain (on unix).

  1. get rid of the header

    sed '2,$!d'

  2. sum the n'th column

    awk '{sum += $n}; END {print sum}'

so all together, doing this for the third column:

sed '2,$!d' <filename> | awk '{sum += $3}; END {print sum}'

if your implementation of awk does truncation this might be better:

(awk '{print $3}' <filename> | sed '2,$!d' | tr "\012" "+"; echo "0") | bc 

or this:

(awk '{print $3}' <filename> | sed '2,$!d' | paste -sd+ -) | bc

(some implementation of paste need the '-' specified in order to read from stdin.

e7 v01L4! 13530.77 :)

SPOILER:

if you stick on perl, how about that:

perl -nle '$sum += $_ } END { print $sum' <filename>
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