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this code in delphi2007 is convert success for example: i have a chinese 短刀 , in delphi2007 convert is B5 CC B5 C6 ,but in delphi 2010 convert is 77 ED 52 00

    function StringToHex(str: string): string;
    var

       i:integer;
       s:string;
    begin
       s:='';

       for i:=1 to length(str) do begin
           s:=s+inttohex(Integer(str[i]),2);
       end;
       result:=s;
    end;

but in delphi2010, it's wrong who can edit it work in delphi2010 success?

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1  
related to: stackoverflow.com/questions/2491993/delphi-5-to-2010 –  prusswan Jul 23 '11 at 6:43
2  
Try using bintohex –  RRUZ Jul 23 '11 at 7:08
    
I don't know in which version the classes.bintohex became available, but if it isn't in D2007 and you have JCL installed then it has such a conversion routine too. Also, perhaps Ord(str[i]) instead of Integer(str[i]) is better. –  ain Jul 23 '11 at 11:24
    
I'm a little surprised that someone could be using chinese characters in pre-unicode, and unicode-Delphi and NOT KNOW ABOUT UNICODE or MBCS and what they are. –  Warren P Jul 23 '11 at 15:28
    
What is your system codepage Aken!? –  Warren P Jul 23 '11 at 19:20

3 Answers 3

First, in Delphi 2007, String=AnsiString, and in Delphi 2010, String=UnicodeString. That is enough explanation for you to understand, if you know what AnsiString (char is 8 bits) and UnicodeString (char is 16 bits) means.

Even though you are calling "IntToHex(x,2)", each Delphi 2010 character when converted to an integer will be in the range from 0 to 65535, which means that the IntToHex call is returning between 2 and 4 hex digits, which makes it hard for you to read the results without confusion.

A minimal unicode-aware fix is to change to IntToHex(x,4) for unicode versions of delphi, and maybe put a space in there so you can at least see where the codepoints separate Four digits like 0000 is enough hex digits for a single unicode character represented as hex. Two digits is not enough.

Why are the values different though? That's a good question. Let me try to make it clearer; I believe you are seeing a consequence of using Delphi 2007 and its ANSI+MBCS support (which is codepage reliant) versus Delphi 2010 which uses Unicode Strings. You should not be surprised that MBCS values different from unicode codepoints.

Also you should know that it takes two hex digits to show a byte, and four hex digits to show a Unicode character, which is 16 bits in size.

If you really want to see the Hex of the UTF8 string, then in Delphi 2010 you must create a UTF8 string first. If you really want MBCS, then say so. The whole world is Unicode now, I suggest you let MBCS go.

Fixed code for Unicode strings character codepoints (4 hex digits, 16 bit):

A UnicodeString=String aware version (Delphi 2009,2010,XE):

function StringToHex16(str: string): string;
var
   i:integer;
   s:string;
begin
       s:='';

       for i:=1 to length(str) do begin
           s:=s+inttohex(Integer(str[i]),4);
       end;
       result:=s;

end;

UTF8 version for Delphi 2009,2010,XE:

function StringToHexUtf8(str: string): string;
var
   i:integer;
   s:string;
   u:RawByteString;
begin
       u := Utf8String(str);
       s:='';

       for i:=1 to length(u) do begin
           s:=s+inttohex(Integer(u[i]),2);
       end;
       result:=s;

end;

And finally, since probably what you want is to reproduce exactly Delphi 2007's behaviour, here is an explicit example using MBCS functions:

function StringToHexMbcs(str: string;cp:Integer): string;
var
   sz,i:integer;
   s:string;
   u:RawByteString;
   flags:Integer;
begin
  // use cp 936 or 950 for simplified or traditional chinese mbcs.
  flags := WC_COMPOSITECHECK or WC_DISCARDNS or WC_SEPCHARS or WC_DEFAULTCHAR;
  sz := Windows.WideCharToMultiByte(  cp,  flags, @str[1],-1,nil,0,nil,nil); // get length.
  SetLength(u,sz+1);
  Windows.WideCharToMultiByte(  cp,  flags, @str[1],Length(str),@u[1],sz-1, nil,nil);
  s:='';
  for i:=1 to sz do begin
        s:=s+inttohex(Integer(u[i]),2);
  end;
  result:=s;
end;

For future reference though, Delphi 2007 is not the gold standard of what is "right". You have to make some effort to understand the difference between MBCS and Unicode.

share|improve this answer
    
Is it correct to say "a Unicode character is 16 bits in size"? UTF-8 needs up to three bytes to encode a BMP code point. –  mjn Jul 23 '11 at 22:03
    
A UnicodeChar in Delphi is 16 bits in size. See? –  Warren P Jul 23 '11 at 22:33
    
If an Character is the same as an Unicode Character, then it's actual size depend on the encoding (the transformation). An Delphi UnicodeChar is actually a 16bit code using the UTF16 notation: there are Unicode Code Points that require surrogate pairs in UTF16 notations, making one single Unicode Character two 16bits codes long. –  Cosmin Prund Jul 24 '11 at 5:49
    
Leaving aside surrogate pairs, which indeed are a part of the Unicode specification, the type in Delphi that goes by the common name 'UnicodeChar' is, always, exactly and precisely 16 bits in size. Two of them might be needed to hold a single surrogate pair, and for that sad reality I weep. let us not conflate the Unicode specification and the delphi compiler, and its types, which do not in any way vary, change, or grow in some uncertain (bogus) way. Then we can avoid having to scream and run away. –  Warren P Nov 22 '11 at 21:34

To obtain the same result in D2010 as in D2007, simple change the function parameter from (Unicode)String to AnsiString. Any string value you pass in, regardless of type, with be converted by the RTL into its MBCS equivalent based on the system default codepage - the same AnsiString has always used in past versions and continues using.

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The difference is probably that in D2007, the string is UTF-8 encoded, and in Delphi 2010, it is UTF-16 encoded.

EDIT: as Warren says, it is not UTF-8, it is MBCS.

That means that in D2007, the routine reads all bytes that encode the string, while in D2010, which uses WideChar as the base for Char, only the hex of the low byte of each WideChar is added to the string. Since the string is already encoded very differently in UTF-16 than in MBCS, the resulting "hex" string is bound to be very different.

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Delphi 2007 Strings didn't support UTF8, but they did support MBCS. –  Warren P Jul 23 '11 at 15:12
    
your code is wrong , i use first code , the result is same to me, the second code convert 短刀 of E79FADE58880, the Correct result is B5 CC B5 C6 –  aken Jul 23 '11 at 18:24
    
Aken what makes you think that the result B5 CC B5 C6 is correct? Did you not understand ANYTHING I said about Unicode and MBCS? –  Warren P Jul 23 '11 at 19:05
    
@Warren: OK, MBCS (although one could claim that UTF-8 is also a MBCS, I know you mean the Windows MBCS). –  Rudy Velthuis Jul 24 '11 at 15:32
    
It is specifically NOT the UTF8 encoding, so even if UTF-8 is an MBCS, a Chinese AnsiString is not UTF-8 encoded it's a codepage dependant (CP936 or 950) Windows far-eastern MBCS. –  Warren P Jul 24 '11 at 21:15

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