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I have a question about functional dependencies. My understanding was that, for example, if I write class Graph g a b | g -> a, g -> b, then any specific g can be associated with only one type of a and b. Indeed, trying to declare two instance with the same g and different a and b does not work.

However, the compiler (ghc) seems unable to use the dependency in the following case,

class (Eq a, Eq b) => Graph g a b | g -> a, g -> b where
    edges :: g -> [b]
    src :: g -> b -> a
    dst :: g -> b -> a

    vertices :: g -> [a]
    vertices g = List.nub $ map (src g) (edges g) ++ map (dst g) (edges g)

class Graph g a b => Subgraph g a b | g -> a, g -> b where
    extVertices :: g -> [b]

data Subgraph1 g where
    Subgraph1 :: Graph g a b => g -> [b] -> Subgraph1 g

instance Graph g a b => Graph (Subgraph1 g) a b where
    vertices (Subgraph1 g _) = vertices g
    edges (Subgraph1 g _) = edges g
    src (Subgraph1 g _) = src g
    dst (Subgraph1 g _) = dst g

If I revise Subgraph1 by adding the parameters a and b to the type signature, then everything works out.

data Subgraph1 g a b where
    Subgraph1 :: Graph g a b => g -> [b] -> Subgraph1 g a b
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You need to use an associated type rather than an MPTC and fundep to avoid having the edge type infect your Subgraph type's signature. This is one small part of why they were invented. – Edward KMETT Jul 23 '11 at 10:50
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Don't use fundeps, they are too much pain. Use associated types.

class (Eq (Vertex g), Eq (Edge g)) => Graph g where
  type Edge   g :: *
  type Vertex g :: *

  edges :: g -> [Edge g]
  src   :: g -> Edge g -> Vertex g
  dst   :: g -> Edge g -> Vertex g

  vertices :: g -> [Vertex g]
  vertices g = nub $ map (src g) (edges g) ++ map (dst g) (edges g)

class Graph g => Subgraph g where
  extVertices :: g -> [Edge g]

data Subgraph1 g where
    Subgraph1 :: Graph g => g -> [Edge g] -> Subgraph1 g

instance Graph g => Graph (Subgraph1 g) where
    type Edge (Subgraph1 g) = Edge g
    type Vertex (Subgraph1 g) = Vertex g
    vertices (Subgraph1 g _) = vertices g
    edges (Subgraph1 g _) = edges g
    src (Subgraph1 g _) = src g
    dst (Subgraph1 g _) = dst g

This looks somewhat more readable. Edge g is the type of g's edges, etc.

Note that I translated your code mechanically, without understanding what Subgraph1 does. Why do you need a GADT here, and what the second argument of the data constructor means? It is not used anywhere.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice, that looks beautiful! I read about these but haven't used them yet. The GADT was used to say that only types g which were graphs could be used to construct Subgraph1. – gatoatigrado Jul 23 '11 at 17:18

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