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After an AJAX request, sometimes my application may return an empty object, like:

var a = ({});

How can I check whether that's the case?

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1  
Do you use JSON.js script? Or any other JSON library. Then you can use JSON.encode() function to convert var to string and then test it. –  Thevs Mar 25 '09 at 13:50

31 Answers 31

up vote 468 down vote accepted

For those of you who have the same problem but uses jQuery, you can use jQuery.isEmptyObject.

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31  
HEY! I just spent a few hours debugging IE 8 issues only to find that it was jQuery.isEmptyObject that was causing the problem. It returns true if the object is empty. –  MFD3000 Aug 17 '11 at 19:03
117  
Why do you post answer including jQuery if the question is not about jQuery at all? –  Eru Oct 1 '12 at 14:10
33  
I know its an old comment, but I wonder your question @MFD3000, because the docu says: returns true, if object is empty (as the name indicates it) –  Александр Фишер Dec 12 '12 at 19:44
16  
including jQuery for such a basic task is not what I would call the right answer. It's true that nowadays jQuery is almost ubiquous, but still we shouldn't forget it is built around a very capable language itself. –  Pablo Mescher Feb 27 '13 at 17:04
11  
It is a shame that this has been marked as the answer.. :( –  Peter Aron Zentai Jun 6 '14 at 18:02

There's no easy way to do this. You'll have to loop over the properties explicitly:

function isEmpty(obj) {
    for(var prop in obj) {
        if(obj.hasOwnProperty(prop))
            return false;
    }

    return true;
}

If ECMAScript 5 support is available, you can use Object.keys() instead:

function isEmpty(obj) {
    return Object.keys(obj).length === 0;
}
share|improve this answer
38  
This works fine, or more simply: function isEmpty(object) { for(var i in object) { return true; } return false; } –  Nicholas Kreidberg Mar 24 '10 at 23:23
19  
Shouldnt true and false be reversed in this function? –  namtax May 5 '10 at 13:46
13  
@namtax: no - the function is named isEmpty(), so it should return false if it has a property –  Christoph May 6 '10 at 16:31
5  
empty object will extend the default Object class but if the object prototype is modified your simplified function will fail consider: Object.prototype.a='hi'; var obj={}; alert(obj.a); // outputs "hi" isEmpty(obj) // returns false –  venimus Apr 8 '11 at 14:38
12  
You shouldn't use the second example since it's O(n) time complexity and O(n) space complexity, whereas the first is O(1). –  Brian Jul 29 '13 at 2:58

You can use Underscore.js.

_.isEmpty({}); // true
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8  
Or you could use lodash is empty (lodash.com/docs#isEmpty), but how is that any different from using a jQuery solution - you still need to install an additional library. I think a vanilla javascript solution is the intent. –  tfmontague Jul 23 '14 at 23:38
3  
It's different if you want to use JS on the backend with Node.js. Few people will want to use jQuery (a front-end library used mostly for DOM manipulations) on the backend. –  Nahn Sep 22 '14 at 16:47
2  
Underscore is being replaced with lodash. Use that instead. –  demisx Feb 11 at 1:44
if(Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj).length === 0){
  //is empty
}

see http://bencollier.net/2011/04/javascript-is-an-object-empty/

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4  
This does not work in IE8 and below. –  Stilltorik Apr 25 '14 at 8:09
4  
This includes non-enumerable properties, in case you care. –  torazaburo Sep 3 '14 at 13:33

This is my preferred solution:

var obj = {};
return Object.keys(obj).length; //returns 0 if empty or an integer > 0 if non-empty
share|improve this answer
6  
this is such a clean and elegant solution. +1 –  smftre Aug 11 '14 at 12:55
4  
this should be the answer –  Udo Jan 27 at 18:58
1  
@Jero Franzani: no it doesn't –  nikoskip Jun 16 at 15:39

Old question, but just had the issue. Including JQuery is not really a good idea if your only purpose is to check if the object is not empty. Instead, just deep into JQuery's code, and you will get the answer:

function isEmptyObject(obj) {
    var name;
    for (name in obj) {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This is only useful if some other process hasn't added a prototype to your base object. To make this truly workable, you need to test for obj.hasOwnProperty(name) –  mpemburn May 14 '14 at 16:10

How about using JSON.stringify? It is almost available in all modern browsers.

function isEmptyObject(obj){
    return JSON.stringify(obj) === '{}';
}
share|improve this answer
20  
return (JSON.stringify(obj) == '{}') –  Vic Sep 11 '13 at 15:05
1  
This is a very neat solution. Thanks you! –  Lavixu Apr 21 '14 at 7:05
10  
This is slow and speed matters for this kind of utility. Quick perf test here: jsperf.com/empty-object-test –  rur Jun 11 '14 at 6:21
  1. Just a workaround. Can your server generate some special property in case of no data?

    For example:

    var a = {empty:true};
    

    Then you can easily check it in your AJAX callback code.

  2. Another way to check it:

    if (a.toSource() === "({})")  // then 'a' is empty
    

EDIT: If you use any JSON library (f.e. JSON.js) then you may try JSON.encode() function and test the result against empty value string.

share|improve this answer
5  
toSource() is non-standard and doesn't work in IE or Opera (and potentially other browsers I didn't check) –  Christoph Mar 25 '09 at 12:21
3  
@Thevs: perhaps you have a different copy of the current version of ECMA-262, but mine does not list a toSource property in section 15.2.4; according to MDC, it was introduced in JS1.3 (i.e. Netscape Navigator 4.06), but it's NOT in ECMA-262, 3rd edition! –  Christoph Mar 25 '09 at 22:47
3  
@Thevs: well, at least 2 important browser vendors didn't implement it, so it's hardly a de-facto-standard, and as it's not in ECMA-262, it's not a real one either... –  Christoph Mar 26 '09 at 9:34
1  
Even when it does work, toSource() is a horrible way to do this (as is JSON.encode()). It needs to build a string representing your entire object to just check if it's empty. There's the overhead of converting things to strings, but moreover it will need to convert a million things if your object has a million properties, while actually just looking at one will let you know that it is not empty. –  Jasper Aug 12 '14 at 8:42
1  
@Thevs the overhead is bigger, even if it might be (I'm not sure it is under every circumstance) in the same order of magnitude. However, that answer involves returning false as soon as a different property is found which makes the story is different all together... –  Jasper Sep 1 '14 at 8:32

I just ran into a similar situation. I didn't want to use JQuery, and wanted to do this using pure Javascript.

And what I did was, used the following condition, and it worked for me.

var obj = {};
if(JSON.stringify(obj) === '{}') { //This will check if the object is empty
   //Code here..
}

For not equal to, use this : JSON.stringify(obj) !== '{}'

Check out this JSFiddle

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1  
Will fail for objects with circular references as JSON.stringify specifically throws an exception for them. –  Pedro Montoto García Dec 18 '14 at 16:13
1  
@PedroMontotoGarcía Ok and how will an empty object have a circular reference? –  KthProg Jan 28 at 21:18
2  
If the object is not empty (and it should work for them too). –  Pedro Montoto García Jan 29 at 10:31

There is a simple way if you are on a newer browser. Object.keys(obj).length == 0

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4  
Improving this, obj.keys == undefined || obj.keys.length == 0 –  fotanus Jul 8 '14 at 11:44

I am using this.

function isObjectEmpty(object)
{
  var isEmpty = true;
  for(keys in object)
  {
     isEmpty = false;
     break; // exiting since we found that the object is not empty
  }
  return isEmpty;
}

Eg:

var myObject = {}; // Object is empty
var isEmpty  = isObjectEmpty(myObject); // will return true;

// populating the object
myObject = {"name":"John Smith","Address":"Kochi, Kerala"}; 

// check if the object is empty
isEmpty  = isObjectEmpty(myObject); // will return false;

from here

Update

OR

you can use the jQuery implementation of isEmptyObject

function isEmptyObject ( obj ) {
        var name;
        for ( name in obj ) {
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }
share|improve this answer

I've created a complete function to determine if object is empty.

It uses Object.keys from ECMAScript 5 (ES5) functionality if possible to achieve the best performance possible (see compatibility table) and fallbacks to the most compatible approach for older engines (browsers).

Solution

/**
 * Returns true if specified object has no properties,
 * false otherwise.
 *
 * @param {object} object
 * @returns {boolean}
 */
function isObjectEmpty(object)
{
    if ('object' !== typeof object) {
        throw new Error('Object must be specified.');
    }

    if (null === object) {
        return true;
    }

    if ('undefined' !== Object.keys) {
        // Using ECMAScript 5 feature.
        return (0 === Object.keys(object).length);
    } else {
        // Using legacy compatibility mode.
        for (var key in object) {
            if (object.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
    }
}

Here's the Gist for this code.

And here's the JSFiddle with demonstration and a simple test.

I hope it will help someone. Cheers!

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1  
This fails for a null object. –  torazaburo Sep 3 '14 at 13:24

jQuery have special function isEmptyObject() for this case:

jQuery.isEmptyObject({}) // true
jQuery.isEmptyObject({ foo: "bar" }) // false

Read more on http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.isEmptyObject/

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function isEmpty(obj) {
  for(var i in obj) { return false; }
  return true;
}
share|improve this answer
4  
That'll report also true, when, for instance, a JavaScript library extends Object with a method through the prototype chain, because that's enumerable and the for in statement loops through enumerable properties. –  Török Gábor Apr 24 '09 at 13:20


you can use this simple code that did not use jQuery or other libraries

var a=({});

//check is an empty object
if(JSON.stringify(a)=='{}') {
    alert('it is empty');
} else {
    alert('it is not empty');
}

JSON class and it's functions (parse and stringify) are very usefull but has some problems with IE7 that you can fix it with this simple code http://www.json.org/js.html.

Other Simple Way (simplest Way) :
you can use this way without using jQuery or JSON object.

var a=({});

function isEmptyObject(obj) {
    if(typeof obj!='object') {
        //it is not object, so is not empty
        return false;
    } else {
        var x,i=0;
        for(x in obj) {
            i++;
        }
        if(i>0) {
            //this object has some properties or methods
            return false;
        } else {
            //this object has not any property or method
            return true;
        }
    }
}

alert(isEmptyObject(a));    //true is alerted
share|improve this answer

If jQuery and the web browser is not available, there is also an isEmpty function in underscore.js.

_.isEmpty({}) // returns true

Additionally, it does not assume the input parameter to be an object. For a list or string or undefined, it will also turn the correct answer.

share|improve this answer

My take:

function isEmpty(obj) {
    return !Object.keys(obj).length > 0;
}

var a = {a:1, b:2}
var b = {}

console.log(isEmpty(a)); // false
console.log(isEmpty(b)); // true

Just, I don't think all browsers implement Object.keys() currently.

share|improve this answer

Caveat! Beware of JSON's limitiations.

javascript:
  obj={  f:function(){}  };
  alert( "Beware!! obj is NOT empty!\n\nobj = {  f:function(){}  }" + 
               "\n\nJSON.stringify( obj )\n\nreturns\n\n" +
                        JSON.stringify( obj ) );

displays

    Beware!! obj is NOT empty!

    obj = {  f:function(){}  }

    JSON.stringify( obj )

    returns

    {}
share|improve this answer

In addition to Thevs answer:

var o = {};
alert($.toJSON(o)=='{}'); // true

var o = {a:1};
alert($.toJSON(o)=='{}'); // false

it's jquery + jquery.json

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Sugar.JS provides extended objects for this purpose. The code is clean and simple:

Make an extended object:

a = Object.extended({})

Check it's size:

a.size()
share|improve this answer

this one line code helps

var a = {}; //if empty returns false
(Object.getOwnPropertyNames != undefined ? Object.getOwnPropertyNames(a).length != 0 : (function(){for(var key in a) break; return (key != null) && (key != undefined);})()) //Returns False

var a = {b:2} //if not empty returns true
(Object.getOwnPropertyNames != undefined ? Object.getOwnPropertyNames(a).length != 0 : (function(){for(var key in a) break; return (key != null) && (key != undefined);})()) //Returns true

Object.getOwnPropertyNames is implemented in ECMA-5. the above line works in older browsers with a fallback function.

JSFiddler

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3  
"One" line... :) –  Léon Pelletier Mar 5 at 16:18
    isEmpty = function(obj) {
      if (obj == null) return true;
      if (obj.constructor.name == "Array" || obj.constructor.name == "String") return obj.length === 0;
      for (var key in obj) if (isEmpty(obj[key])) return true;
      return false;
    }

This will check the emptiness of String, Array or Object (Maps).

Usage :

var a = {"a":"xxx","b":[1],"c":{"c_a":""}}
isEmpty(a); // true, because a.c.c_a is empty.
isEmpty("I am a String"); //false
share|improve this answer

A simple loop:

var is_empty = true;
for(var i in obj) {
    is_empty = false;
    break;
}
share|improve this answer

As of jQuery 1.4 isEmptyObject() method checks both properties on the object itself and properties inherited from prototypes (in that it doesn't use hasOwnProperty). The argument should always be a plain JavaScript Object as other types of object (DOM elements, primitive strings/numbers, host objects) may not give consistent results across browsers. To determine if an object is a plain JavaScript object, use $.isPlainObject().

jQuery.isPlainObject({}) // true

jQuery.isPlainObject( "test" ) // false

Jquery api

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If you are checking object's emptiness for going in some code block, add a break after first foreach round, the code looks as simple as if statement.

 for(key in obj){

 //your work here.

 break;
 }
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I was returning an empty JSON response for an AJAX call and in IE8 jQuery.isEmptyObject() was not validating correctly. I added an additional check that seems to catch it properly.

.done(function(data)
{  
    // Parse json response object
    var response = jQuery.parseJSON(data);

    // In IE 8 isEmptyObject doesn't catch the empty response, so adding additional undefined check
    if(jQuery.isEmptyObject(response) || response.length === 0)
    {
        //empty
    }
    else
    {
        //not empty
    }
});
share|improve this answer

Another alternative is to use is.js (14kB) as opposed to jquery (32kB), lodash (50kB), or underscore (16.4kB). is.js proved to be the fastest library among aforementioned libraries that could be used to determine whether an object is empty.

http://jsperf.com/check-empty-object-using-libraries

Obviously all these libraries are not exactly the same so if you need to easily manipulate the DOM then jquery might still be a good choice or if you need more than just type checking then lodash or underscore might be good. As for is.js, here is the syntax:

var a = {};
is.empty(a); // true
is.empty({"hello": "world"}) // false

Like underscore's and lodash's _.isObject(), this is not exclusively for objects but also applies to arrays and strings.

Under the hood this library is using Object.getOwnPropertyNames which is similar to Object.keys but Object.getOwnPropertyNames is a more thorough since it will return enumerable and non-enumerable properties as described here.

is.empty = function(value) {
    if(is.object(value)){
        var num = Object.getOwnPropertyNames(value).length;
        if(num === 0 || (num === 1 && is.array(value)) || (num === 2 && is.arguments(value))){
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    } else {
        return value === '';
    }
};

If you don't want to bring in a library (which is understandable) and you know that you are only checking objects (not arrays or strings) then the following function should suit your needs.

function isEmptyObject( obj ) {
    return Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj).length === 0;
}

This is only a bit faster than is.js though just because you aren't checking whether it is an object.

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You can define you own object prototype, just before its usage or at the beginning of your code.

The definition should look like this:

Object.prototype.hasOwnProperties = function()
{ 
  for (var k in this)
  { 
    if ( this.hasOwnProperty(k) )
    { 
      return true;
    } 
  }
  return false;
}

Here is a usage example:

var a = {};

while ( a.status !== "finished" )
{  
  if ( status === "processing" )
  {
    a.status = "finished";  
  }
  
  if ( status === "starting" )
  {
    a.status = "processing";  
  }
  
  if ( !a.hasOwnProperties() )
  {
    a.status = "starting";
  }
}

Enjoy! :-)

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I have an easy(but not generic) solution for this scenario :

if you know a specific property name for your object , then you can easily check if that property exists. This way you would know if that object is empty or not , and you wouldn't need to traverse all the properties or use a library.

Let me give an example : there is an object that , if its not empty, must have a property named "myProperty". Then you can check it like :

if(myObject['myProperty']){
alert("NOT EMPTY");
}else{
    alert("EMPTY")
}

this is not a generic solution but it's been doing all i need actually, as most times i know what to expect in an object that i'm performing an empty check.

share|improve this answer

A version adding isEmpty() to the object prototype:

// As a prototype:
Object.prototype.isEmpty = function() {
    for(var i in this) 
        return false;
    return true;
}

// As a function
function objectIsEmpty(obj) {
    for (var i in obj) return false;
    return true;
}

var obj = {};
if (obj.isEmpty()) console.log('empty');
if (objectIsEmpty(obj)) console.log('empty');
share|improve this answer
2  
Without Object.hasOwnProperty, this function will always return true (the function is called isEmpty, but returns true when it's not empty, by the way...). Also, the function will not invoke itself automatically. Add () after obj.isEmpty. –  Rob W May 7 '12 at 14:01

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