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After an AJAX request, sometimes my application may return an empty object, like:

var a = ({});

How can I check whether that's the case?

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Do you use JSON.js script? Or any other JSON library. Then you can use JSON.encode() function to convert var to string and then test it. –  Thevs Mar 25 '09 at 13:50
    
possible duplicate of Is object empty? –  laggingreflex Apr 15 at 13:25
    
It seems more like that one is a duplicate, since this was asked back in 2009. –  falmp Apr 15 at 13:29
    
@falmp You're right. But it's the answers that should decide which one should be marked as duplicate. 1 2. Answers there are much more "latest". –  laggingreflex Apr 15 at 14:09
    
We have this answer here too, so if the questions get merged we should let the community decide which is the best answer and upvote it when they feel it's appropriated. What I see now is 270 upvotes on the choosen answer and 20 answers here versus 102 upvotes on the choosen answer and 13 answers there. –  falmp Apr 15 at 14:47
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21 Answers

up vote 272 down vote accepted

For those of you who have the same problem but uses jQuery, you can use jQuery.isEmptyObject.

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15  
HEY! I just spent a few hours debugging IE 8 issues only to find that it was jQuery.isEmptyObject that was causing the problem. It returns true if the object is empty. –  MFD3000 Aug 17 '11 at 19:03
3  
This won't work if you (or any plugin) modified Object.prototype. –  Miszy Jun 5 '12 at 9:13
22  
Why do you post answer including jQuery if the question is not about jQuery at all? –  Eru Oct 1 '12 at 14:10
12  
I know its an old comment, but I wonder your question @MFD3000, because the docu says: returns true, if object is empty (as the name indicates it) –  Александр Фишер Dec 12 '12 at 19:44
1  
including jQuery for such a basic task is not what I would call the right answer. It's true that nowadays jQuery is almost ubiquous, but still we shouldn't forget it is built around a very capable language itself. –  Pablo Mescher Feb 27 '13 at 17:04
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There's no easy way to do this. You'll have to loop over the properties explicitly:

function isEmpty(obj) {
    for(var prop in obj) {
        if(obj.hasOwnProperty(prop))
            return false;
    }

    return true;
}

If ECMAScript 5 support is available, you can use Object.keys() instead:

function isEmpty(obj) {
    return Object.keys(obj).length === 0;
}
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16  
This works fine, or more simply: function isEmpty(object) { for(var i in object) { return true; } return false; } –  Nicholas Kreidberg Mar 24 '10 at 23:23
7  
Shouldnt true and false be reversed in this function? –  namtax May 5 '10 at 13:46
4  
@namtax: no - the function is named isEmpty(), so it should return false if it has a property –  Christoph May 6 '10 at 16:31
4  
empty object will extend the default Object class but if the object prototype is modified your simplified function will fail consider: Object.prototype.a='hi'; var obj={}; alert(obj.a); // outputs "hi" isEmpty(obj) // returns false –  venimus Apr 8 '11 at 14:38
2  
You shouldn't use the second example since it's O(n) time complexity and O(n) space complexity, whereas the first is O(1). –  Brian Jul 29 '13 at 2:58
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You can use Underscore.js.

_.isEmpty({}); // true
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Old question, but just had the issue. Including JQuery is not really a good idea if your only purpose is to check if the object is not empty. Instead, just deep into JQuery's code, and you will get the answer:

function isEmptyObject(obj) {
    var name;
    for (name in obj) {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}
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if(Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj).length === 0){
  //is empty
}

see http://bencollier.net/2011/04/javascript-is-an-object-empty/

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How could it be any easier? Thanks. –  augurone Apr 7 at 22:07
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  1. Just a workaround. Can your server generate some special property in case of no data?

    For example:

    var a = {empty:true};
    

    Then you can easily check it in your AJAX callback code.

  2. Another way to check it:

    if (a.toSource() === "({})")  // then 'a' is empty
    

EDIT: If you use any JSON library (f.e. JSON.js) then you may try JSON.encode() function and test the result against empty value string.

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2  
toSource() is non-standard and doesn't work in IE or Opera (and potentially other browsers I didn't check) –  Christoph Mar 25 '09 at 12:21
    
This is standard in ECMA-262. There are non-standard browsers though. –  Thevs Mar 25 '09 at 20:46
2  
@Thevs: perhaps you have a different copy of the current version of ECMA-262, but mine does not list a toSource property in section 15.2.4; according to MDC, it was introduced in JS1.3 (i.e. Netscape Navigator 4.06), but it's NOT in ECMA-262, 3rd edition! –  Christoph Mar 25 '09 at 22:47
    
@Christoph: How do you think 3 other browsers would implement the same 'non-standard' feature if that wouldn't be a standard? :) –  Thevs Mar 26 '09 at 9:20
3  
@Thevs: well, at least 2 important browser vendors didn't implement it, so it's hardly a de-facto-standard, and as it's not in ECMA-262, it's not a real one either... –  Christoph Mar 26 '09 at 9:34
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How about using JSON.stringify? It is almost available in all modern browsers.

function isEmptyObject(obj){
    if (JSON.stringify(obj) == '{}'){
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}
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5  
return (JSON.stringify(obj) == '{}') –  Vic Sep 11 '13 at 15:05
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I am using this.

function isObjectEmpty(object)
{
  var isEmpty = true;
  for(keys in object)
  {
     isEmpty = false;
     break; // exiting since we found that the object is not empty
  }
  return isEmpty;
}

Eg:

var myObject = {}; // Object is empty
var isEmpty  = isObjectEmpty(myObject); // will return true;

// populating the object
myObject = {"name":"John Smith","Address":"Kochi, Kerala"}; 

// check if the object is empty
isEmpty  = isObjectEmpty(myObject); // will return false;

from here

Update

OR

you can use the jQuery implementation of isEmptyObject

function isEmptyObject ( obj ) {
        var name;
        for ( name in obj ) {
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }
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hi. when you test this function with number or boolean true or false return true and this is not correct result. isObjectEmpty(true). isObjectEmpty(false). isObjectEmpty(1) –  iman Sep 3 '13 at 4:40
    
We are checking whether the object is empty, not if the data type is an object. In your case to check if its an object we need to something like if(typeof a === "object") {...} –  kiranvj Sep 3 '13 at 6:31
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jQuery have special function isEmptyObject() for this case:

jQuery.isEmptyObject({}) // true
jQuery.isEmptyObject({ foo: "bar" }) // false

Read more on http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.isEmptyObject/

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It is available in 1.4 –  Shuaib Nawaz Aug 13 '11 at 0:34
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There is a simple way if you are on a newer browser. Object.keys(obj).length == 0

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you can use this simple code that did not use jQuery or other libraries

var a=({});

//check is an empty object
if(JSON.stringify(a)=='{}') {
    alert('it is empty');
} else {
    alert('it is not empty');
}

JSON class and it's functions (parse and stringify) are very usefull but has some problems with IE7 that you can fix it with this simple code http://www.json.org/js.html.

Other Simple Way (simplest Way) :
you can use this way without using jQuery or JSON object.

var a=({});

function isEmptyObject(obj) {
    if(typeof obj!='object') {
        //it is not object, so is not empty
        return false;
    } else {
        var x,i=0;
        for(x in obj) {
            i++;
        }
        if(i>0) {
            //this object has some properties or methods
            return false;
        } else {
            //this object has not any property or method
            return true;
        }
    }
}

alert(isEmptyObject(a));    //true is alerted
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My take:

function isEmpty(obj) {
    return !Object.keys(obj).length > 0;
}

var a = {a:1, b:2}
var b = {}

console.log(isEmpty(a)); // false
console.log(isEmpty(b)); // true

Just, I don't think all browsers implement Object.keys() currently.

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In addition to Thevs answer:

var o = {};
alert($.toJSON(o)=='{}'); // true

var o = {a:1};
alert($.toJSON(o)=='{}'); // false

it's jquery + jquery.json

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I don't like using JSON because it can't work with circular object structures. –  itdoesntwork Jan 3 '13 at 18:28
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Go with the jQuery.isEmptyObject.

But if you don't have jQuery and want a quick check I found == '' works for checking empty objects as well.

if (myObject == '') {
    alert('this object is empty');
}
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2  
I don't think that works - your test returns false with an empty object in at least the following browsers: Chrome 23, Safari 6, Firefox 15. –  mklement0 Nov 26 '12 at 14:30
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function isEmpty(obj) {
  for(var i in obj) { return false; }
  return true;
}
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4  
That'll report also true, when, for instance, a JavaScript library extends Object with a method through the prototype chain, because that's enumerable and the for in statement loops through enumerable properties. –  Török Gábor Apr 24 '09 at 13:20
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Sugar.JS provides extended objects for this purpose. The code is clean and simple:

Make an extended object:

a = Object.extended({})

Check it's size:

a.size()
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If jQuery and the web browser is not available, there is also an isEmpty function in underscore.js.

_.isEmpty({}) // returns true

Additionally, it does not assume the input parameter to be an object. For a list or string or undefined, it will also turn the correct answer.

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Caveat! Beware of JSON's limitiations.

javascript:
  obj={  f:function(){}  };
  alert( "Beware!! obj is NOT empty!\n\nobj = {  f:function(){}  }" + 
               "\n\nJSON.stringify( obj )\n\nreturns\n\n" +
                        JSON.stringify( obj ) );

displays

    Beware!! obj is NOT empty!

    obj = {  f:function(){}  }

    JSON.stringify( obj )

    returns

    {}
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As of jQuery 1.4 isEmptyObject() method checks both properties on the object itself and properties inherited from prototypes (in that it doesn't use hasOwnProperty). The argument should always be a plain JavaScript Object as other types of object (DOM elements, primitive strings/numbers, host objects) may not give consistent results across browsers. To determine if an object is a plain JavaScript object, use $.isPlainObject().

jQuery.isPlainObject({}) // true

jQuery.isPlainObject( "test" ) // false

Jquery api

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I have an easy(but not generic) solution for this scenario :

if you know a specific property name for your object , then you can easily check if that property exists. This way you would know if that object is empty or not , and you wouldn't need to traverse all the properties or use a library.

Let me give an example : there is an object that , if its not empty, must have a property named "myProperty". Then you can check it like :

if(myObject['myProperty']){
alert("NOT EMPTY");
}else{
    alert("EMPTY")
}

this is not a generic solution but it's been doing all i need actually, as most times i know what to expect in an object that i'm performing an empty check.

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A version adding isEmpty() to the object prototype:

// As a prototype:
Object.prototype.isEmpty = function() {
    for(var i in this) 
        return false;
    return true;
}

// As a function
function objectIsEmpty(obj) {
    for (var i in obj) return false;
    return true;
}

var obj = {};
if (obj.isEmpty()) console.log('empty');
if (objectIsEmpty(obj)) console.log('empty');
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2  
Without Object.hasOwnProperty, this function will always return true (the function is called isEmpty, but returns true when it's not empty, by the way...). Also, the function will not invoke itself automatically. Add () after obj.isEmpty. –  Rob W May 7 '12 at 14:01
    
Also, after just stumbling across this you would probably want to swap the return true/false statements. The function 'isEmpty' should return false once it finds a property, because that means that it is not empty. Semantics, but would probably be a good idea. –  watcher Jul 5 '12 at 13:59
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