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I've developed a custom UserControl. When I add it to a form in design view, there is no obvious border around it (unless I change the BorderStyle property to something other than None).

Some controls (such as PictureBoxes) have a dashed outline to indicate the area they are using. Is there a way to do this for a UserControl?

I'm using C#, .NET 3.5, Windows Forms.

share|improve this question

You'll need to write a custom designer for your UserControl, which is the same thing that WinForms does for the Panel control. The code in the designer class overrides the OnPaintAdornments method in order to draw the dashed border around the control's client area.

The easiest way to get started is by inheriting from the ScrollableControlDesigner class, which will give you most of the necessary functionality for free. Then add the logic into these methods:

public class MyUserControlDesigner : ScrollableControlDesigner
{
   public MyUserControlDesigner()
   {
      base.AutoResizeHandles = true;
   }

   protected override void OnPaintAdornments(PaintEventArgs p)
   {
      // Get the user control that we're designing.
      UserControl component = (UserControl)base.Component;

      // As you mentioned, no reason to draw this border unless the
      // BorderStyle property is set to "None"
      if (component.BorderStyle == BorderStyle.None)
      {
         this.DrawBorder(p.Graphics);
      }

      // Call the base class.
      base.OnPaintAdornments(p);
   }

   protected virtual void DrawBorder(Graphics g)
   {
      // Get the user control that we're designing.
      UserControl component = (UserControl)base.Component;

      // Ensure that the user control we're designing exists and is visible.
      if ((component != null) && component.Visible)
      {
         // Draw the dashed border around the perimeter of its client area.
         using (Pen borderPen = this.BorderPen)
         {
            Rectangle clientRect = this.Control.ClientRectangle;
            clientRect.Width--;
            clientRect.Height--;
            g.DrawRectangle(borderPen, clientRect);
         }
      }
   }

   protected Pen BorderPen
   {
      get
      {
         // Create a Pen object with a color that can be seen on top of
         // the control's background.
         return new Pen((this.Control.BackColor.GetBrightness() < 0.5) ?     
                         ControlPaint.Light(this.Control.BackColor)
                         : ControlPaint.Dark(this.Control.BackColor))
                         { DashStyle = DashStyle.Dash };
      }
   }
}

Once you've done that, you'll need to instruct your UserControl class to use the custom designer you've written. That's done by adding the DesignerAttribute to its class definition:

[Designer(typeof(MyUserControlDesigner)), DesignerCategory("UserControl")]
public class MyUserControl : UserControl
{
    // insert your code here
} 

And of course, this will require that you add a reference to System.Design.dll to your assembly, forcing you to target the full version of the .NET Framework (rather than the "Client Profile").

share|improve this answer
    
Full .Net Framework is not required if you assign the Design class by string ref not by typeof. see archive.msdn.microsoft.com/WinFormsCustomCtrl – Wowa Jul 26 '11 at 15:02
    
Yes, but it's still required on the development machine. I've done exactly what's described in that article before, but it's a giant pain in the rear. And hardly worth it: the Client Profile isn't that much smaller than the full framework. – Cody Gray Jul 26 '11 at 15:06
    
The development machine should always have the the full .net framework. And the Design class is only for developers :) But if you write an application for anybody you force them to install the full .net framework if they only have the client profile. – Wowa Jul 26 '11 at 15:12
    
+1 for elegant pen that will be visible – smirkingman Dec 2 '11 at 10:00

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