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Is there a good alternative for developing applications for Mac in Objective-C except Xcode?

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Why that? Xcode works great. –  dasdom Jul 23 '11 at 9:43
    
It crashes a lot :( –  marian Jul 23 '11 at 9:47
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What version? I recommend 3.2.6. –  Paul R Jul 23 '11 at 9:51
    
I solved my crashing problems by committing all the files to the repository. Before I didn't commit for quite a while. –  dasdom Jul 23 '11 at 10:19
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@marian - it not just crashes, it stinks. I have all kinds of problems with xcode. Not renewing certificates, complaining that code is not compatible with arc when you have the source with "-fno-objc-arc", complaining about files not in the bundle even if they are there, not uploading binaries to app store, crashing 10 times a day... the list goes on and on. I love Apple products and personaly I have had about 10 Apple devices in the last 6 years but Xcode is a piece of stinking sh*t. –  RubberDuck Jul 30 '12 at 22:15

4 Answers 4

There is a new Objective-C IDE JetBrains AppCode http://www.jetbrains.com/objc/. I've just downloaded it, looks promising...

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Here's a great blog post on how to develop really tight code for OS X:

http://cocoawithlove.com/2010/09/minimalist-cocoa-programming.html

All you need is vi and gcc. Of course, whether you find this a good alternative to Xcode is a matter of taste. Personally, I much prefer Xcode despite all its quirks.

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That post is great! It's not even vi ... s/he just used cat - and piped it into gcc! Hilarious. –  Yuji Jul 23 '11 at 16:17

I have been using AppCode for a week now, it is very good but needs Interface builder for editing xibs. The only problem I have seen so far is it is memory hungry, must be written in Java.

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In theory, you could use any text editor to develop your application. This would require that you have an intimate knowledge of all of the different tools that are required to build/test/deploy your application (e.g. gcc, gdb, etc). I'm not sure why anyone would want to do this when Xcode gives you pretty much everything you need right out of the box.

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