Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am developing Soap based web services using Java. Can anyone please let me know how to authenticate the client who is consuming the web services?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Probably the best but most complex is WS-Security with various authentication method. But it is most complex and its good for enterprise enviroment. It allows you to create end-to-end auth and there are lots of options. You can in simple case e.g. use Web Services Security UsernameToken Profile

    <S12:Envelope xmlns:S11="..." xmlns:wsse="..." xmlns:wsu= "...">
  <S12:Header>
  ...
    <wsse:Security>
      <wsse:UsernameToken>
        <wsse:Username>NNK</wsse:Username>
        <wsse:Password Type="...#PasswordDigest">weYI3nXd8LjMNVksCKFV8t3rgHh3Rw==</wsse:Password>
        <wsse:Nonce>WScqanjCEAC4mQoBE07sAQ==</wsse:Nonce>
        <wsu:Created>2003-07-16T01:24:32</wsu:Created>
      </wsse:UsernameToken>
    </wsse:Security>
  ...
  </S12:Header>
...
</S12:Envelope>

I don't know what library you use, but here is a nice article how to install Rampart into Axis2 and implement UsernameToken handling.

But in some, simplified cases you can simply make HTTP Basic Authentication to web server (through SSL). This may be worst solution but sometimes could be easiest to implement. Another solution, not connected with soap can be mutual authenticated SSL (with client auth).

share|improve this answer

WS-Security provides the standard way to secure SOAP based web services and WS-Security Policy says how to communicate those security requirements to out side world.

Authentication can be with username/password - with UsernameToken or certificate based.

Since you are Java based - you can use the open source WSO2 Application Server to deploy your service and with few clicks you can secure your service.

This further explains how to do it...

Thanks...

share|improve this answer

Here is a good example for a Webservice via JAX-WS with authentification

share|improve this answer

I recommend you to read this good article on Securing and Authenticating SOAP-Based Web Services

share|improve this answer

JAX-WS Authentication using SOAP handler

OR

Application Authentication With JAX-WS using javax.xml.ws.WebServiceContext and javax.xml.ws.handler.MessageContext

WebServiceImpl.java

package com.javacodegeeks.enterprise.ws;

import java.util.List;
import java.util.Map;

import javax.annotation.Resource;
import javax.jws.WebService;
import javax.xml.ws.WebServiceContext;
import javax.xml.ws.handler.MessageContext;

@WebService(endpointInterface = "com.javacodegeeks.enterprise.ws.WebServiceInterface")
public class WebServiceImpl implements WebServiceInterface {

    @Resource
    WebServiceContext webServiceContext;

    @Override
    public String getHelloWorldAsString(String str) {

        MessageContext messageContext = webServiceContext.getMessageContext();

        // get request headers
        Map<?,?> requestHeaders = (Map<?,?>) messageContext.get(MessageContext.HTTP_REQUEST_HEADERS);
        List<?> usernameList = (List<?>) requestHeaders.get("username");
        List<?> passwordList = (List<?>) requestHeaders.get("password");

        String username = "";
        String password = "";

        if (usernameList != null) {
            username = usernameList.get(0).toString();
        }

        if (passwordList != null) {
            password = passwordList.get(0).toString();
        }

                // of course this is not real validation
                // you should validate your users from stored databases credentials
        if (username.equals("nikos") && password.equals("superpassword")) {

            return "Valid User :"+str;

        } else {

            return "Unknown User!";
        }
    }
}

WebServiceClient.java

package com.javacodegeeks.enterprise.ws.client;

import java.net.URL;
import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Map;

import javax.xml.namespace.QName;
import javax.xml.ws.BindingProvider;
import javax.xml.ws.Service;
import javax.xml.ws.handler.MessageContext;
import com.javacodegeeks.enterprise.ws.WebServiceInterface;

public class WebServiceClient{

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {

        URL wsdlUrl = new URL("http://localhost:8888/webservice/helloworld?wsdl");

        //qualifier name ...
        QName qname = new QName("http://ws.enterprise.javacodegeeks.com/", "WebServiceImplService");

        Service service = Service.create(wsdlUrl, qname);

        WebServiceInterface sayHello = service.getPort(WebServiceInterface.class);

        Map<String, Object> requestContext = ((BindingProvider)sayHello).getRequestContext();

        requestContext.put(BindingProvider.ENDPOINT_ADDRESS_PROPERTY, "http://localhost:8888/webservice/helloworld?wsdl");

        Map<String, List<String>> requestHeaders = new HashMap<String, List<String>>();

        requestHeaders.put("username", Collections.singletonList("nikos"));
        requestHeaders.put("Password", Collections.singletonList("superpassword"));

        requestContext.put(MessageContext.HTTP_REQUEST_HEADERS, requestHeaders);

        System.out.println(sayHello.getHelloWorldAsString("- This is Java Code Geeks"));

    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.