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Having a bit of trouble moving objects I've created into an array. So what I actually need to do is create objects than move them into an array. I'm not quite sure what I'm doing wrong.

If you think I should be using a arraylist instead of a array please say so

I made a quick example with less data fields than my actual program but its pretty well the same as my larger problem. Thank you for your time.

    public class Music {

private static String songTitle;
private static double songLength;
private int rating;




    public Music(String songTitle, double songLength, int rating) {
    // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub
    }
    public static String getsongTitle()
    {
        return songTitle;
    }
    public static double getsongLength()
     {
    return songLength;
    }
     public static   int rating()
    {
      return rating();
     }

     //constructors for music objects
     Music song1 = new Music ("song name", 5.32, 10);
     Music song2 = new Music ("billy",1.2, 8 );
     Music song3 = new Music ("hello", 1.5, 9 );

     static        //Create array and make posistion 0 = song1

     Music[] songDetails = new Music[3];{
      songDetails[0] = song1;
        }

       public static void main(String[] args) {
       //print first place in array
        System.out.println(songDetails[0]);


       }

Edit had a spelling mistake in the code and was missing the word static in the array declaration

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1  
What "problems" are you having? What do you want to happen and what is actually happening? –  Jeremy Banks Jul 23 '11 at 12:11
    
When I run it there is a null result in position 0 of the songDeatils array. and I want it should say "song name , 5.32 10 –  Bradley Jul 23 '11 at 12:16
    
found your problem. Look at the bottom of my answer. –  zacheusz Jul 23 '11 at 12:25
    
and your Music class was broken - use instance fields, assign fields values in constructor and so on. Look at my example. –  zacheusz Jul 23 '11 at 12:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Almost everything is OK here ;) There are many ways. Simply access songDetails from nonstatic method (and change Music fields to nonstatic, and implement Music constructor):

public class TryMusic {      

    Music song1 = new Music("song name", 5.32, 10);
    Music song2 = new Music("billy", 1.2, 8);
    Music song3 = new Music("hello", 1.5, 9);
    //Create array and make posistion 0 = song1
    Music[] songDetails;// = new Music[3];

    {
       //some initializations goes here
       //...
       //create array when you know how many songs you have
       songDetails = new Music[3];
       // and now fill the array. Possibly iteration? if no then simply use {} syntax
        songDetails[0] = song1;
        songDetails[1] = song2;
        songDetails[2] = song3;
    }

    public void go() {
        //print first place in array
        System.out.println(songDetails[0]);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new TryMusic().go();
    }
}

You may also want do it like this:

public class TryMusic {

    //Create array and make posistion 0 = song1
    Music[] songDetails;// = new Music[3];

    {
        //if you still need initialization block, but don't need field for each song
        songDetails = new Music[3];
        //possibly iteration? if no then simply use {} syntax instead
        songDetails[0] = new Music("song name", 5.32, 10);
        songDetails[1] = new Music("billy", 1.2, 8);
        songDetails[2] = new Music("hello", 1.5, 9);
    }

    public void go() {
        //print first place in array
        System.out.println(songDetails[0]);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new TryMusic().go();
    }
}

or this (more readable):

public class TryMusic {

    //Create array and make posistion 0 = song1
    //if simply array is enough
    Music[] songDetails = { new Music("song name", 5.32, 10),
         new Music("billy", 1.2, 8),
        new Music("hello", 1.5, 9)
    };

    public void go() {
        //print first place in array
        System.out.println(songDetails[0]);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new TryMusic().go();
    }
}

or (more flexible):

public class TryMusic {

    //Create array and make posistion 0 = song1
    List<Music> songDetails = new ArrayList(){{
       add(new Music("song name", 5.32, 10));
       add(new Music("song name", 5.32, 10));
       add(new Music("hello", 1.5, 9));
    }};


    public void go() {
        //print first place in array
        System.out.println(songDetails.get(0));
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new TryMusic().go();
    }
}

COMMENT FOR YOUR EDIT: the array was static, but initialization was not static. You missed static keyword before initialization block:

public class TryMusic {

//Create array and make posistion 0 = song1
static Music[] songDetails = new Music[3];
static {
    songDetails[0] = new Music("song name", 5.32, 10);
    songDetails[1] = new Music("billy", 1.2, 8);
    songDetails[2] = new Music("hello", 1.5, 9);
}


public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println(songDetails[0]);
}

}

and static version with list:

    public class TryMusic {

    //Create array and make posistion 0 = song1
    static List<Music> songDetails = new ArrayList(){{
       add(new Music("song name", 5.32, 10));
       add(new Music("song name", 5.32, 10));
       add(new Music("hello", 1.5, 9));
    }};

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(songDetails.get(0));
    }
}

And oh, I see it now, your Music class is broken too. Use instance fields instead of static and assign values in constructor:

public class Music {

    private String songTitle;
    private double songLength;
    private int rating;

    public Music(String songTitle, double songLength, int rating) {
        this.songTitle = songTitle;
        this.songLength = songLength;
        this.rating = rating;

    }

    public String getsongTitle() {
        return songTitle;
    }

    public double getsongLength() {
        return songLength;
    }

    public int rating() {
        return rating;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "Music{" + "songTitle=" + songTitle + ", songLength=" + songLength + ", rating=" + rating + '}';
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
If I use your version with the static arraylist and I get the result Music@30c221 what Am I doing wrong? I've tried a couple of the solutions suggested here and they all come up with a similar result. –  Bradley Jul 23 '11 at 12:44
    
It is OK then. You have to override toString method in Music to get human readable output :) Look at fixed Music class (instance fields). –  zacheusz Jul 23 '11 at 12:48
2  
+1 for amount of work put in –  Romain Hippeau Jul 23 '11 at 12:56
    
Great with this last bit you wrote this example seems to be working fine thanks a lot for your help. I accepted your answer. Now I'm going to go apply it all on a more complex class. thanks again –  Bradley Jul 23 '11 at 13:09
    
I added some comments to examples now. Maybe you should look at them :) –  zacheusz Jul 23 '11 at 13:12

A very simple way to proceed is:

 //constructors for music objects
 static Music song1 = new Music ("song name", 5.32, 10);
 static Music song2 = new Music ("billy",1.2, 8 );
 static Music song3 = new Music ("hello", 1.5, 9 );

 static Music[] songDetails = { song1, song2, song3 };

 ...

 public static void main(String[] args) {

    System.out.println(songDetails[0].getsongTitle());

 }
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