Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm Making an App. in java , in which there is a Button to which I have added an actionlistner. The ActionEvent it(the button) generates executes some code. Now I want this piece of code to run whenever the app. starts and without pressing the button. I mean, I want to generate the Actionevent (without pressing the button) so that the piece of code the ActionPerformed contains gets executed as the app. start. After that, it may run whenever I press the button.

I've googled it a lot but found no useful information.

Can this be done??

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

You can create ActionEvents like any other Java Object by just using the constructor. And then you can send them directly to the component with Component.processEvent(..)

However, in this case I think you are better making your code into a separate function which is called both:

  • By the ActionListener when the button is pressed
  • Directly by your application startup code (possibility using SwingUtilities.invokeLater() or SwingUtilities.invokeAndWait() if you need it to happen on the event-handling thread)

This way you don't mix up presentation logic with the business logic of whatever the code does....

share|improve this answer

Yes it can be done, but it doesn't really make sense, since your goal isn't to press a button or to call an ActionListener's code, but rather to have a common behavior on button press and on program start up. To me the best way to achieve this is to have a method that is called by both the actionPerformed method of the ActionListener and by the class at start up.

Here's a simple example. In the code below, a method disables a button, turns the JPanel green, and starts a Timer that in 2 seconds enables the button and resets the JPanel's background color to its default. The method that causes this behavior is called both in the main class's constructor and in the JButton's ActionListener's actionPerformed method:

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import javax.swing.*;

public class ActionOnStartUp extends JPanel {
   private static final int PANEL_W = 400;
   private static final int PANEL_H = 300;
   private static final int TIMER_DELAY = 2000;
   private JButton turnGreenBtn = new JButton("Turn Panel Green for 2 seconds");;

   public ActionOnStartUp() {
      turnPanelGreen();

      turnGreenBtn.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
         @Override
         public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
            turnPanelGreen();
         }
      });
      add(turnGreenBtn);
   }

   public void turnPanelGreen() {
      setBackground(Color.green);
      turnGreenBtn.setEnabled(false);
      new Timer(TIMER_DELAY, new ActionListener() {
         public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent ae) {
            setBackground(null);
            turnGreenBtn.setEnabled(true);
            ((Timer) ae.getSource()).stop(); // stop the Timer
         }
      }).start();
   }

   @Override
   public Dimension getPreferredSize() {
      return new Dimension(PANEL_W, PANEL_H);
   }

   public static void createAndShowGui() {
      JFrame frame = new JFrame("Foo");
      frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
      frame.getContentPane().add(new ActionOnStartUp());
      frame.pack();
      frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
      frame.setVisible(true);
   }

   public static void main(String[] args) {
      SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
         public void run() {
            createAndShowGui();
         }
      });
   }
}
share|improve this answer

Usually, the button action event responds to an external event, to notify the application that the user (or rather something or someone) interacted with the application. If your button executes some code that you want to also execute at application start, why not just place everything at it's proper place?

Example:

public class SomeSharedObject {
    public void executeSomeCode() { /*....*/ }
}

Set the button with something like

public void setButtonAction(final SOmeSharedObject obj) {
    button.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) { 
            obj.executeSomeCode();
        }
    });
}

And run at application start with something like

public void initApplication(SomeSharedObject obj) {
    obj.executeSomeCode();     
}

And, if the code you need to execute takes a while to complete, you might want to use a separate thread inside your actionPerformed button event so your application UI does not freeze up.

share|improve this answer
    
No, Mikera didn't state to use SwingUtilities if the code takes a while to complete (that would suggest need of a SwingWorker), but rather to queue the code on the event thread using SwingUtilities.invokeLater(..) if you are calling it at program start up and off of the event thread. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jul 23 '11 at 13:28
1  
you are right, after re-reading his answer, I edited that paragraph –  Yanick Rochon Jul 23 '11 at 13:55

Just Call JButton.doClick() it should fire the ActionEvent associated with the JButton.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.