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"\x3c" => '<' (open bracket)
"\x3e" => '>' (close bracket)
"\x3d" => '=' (equal)

What name is given to the encoding method used above? (\x~~)

It seems to not be URL encoding. It could be a type of utf-8 encoding, but I don't know.

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The encoding is ASCII. (Perhaps you meant to ask about the literal notation?) –  Kerrek SB Jul 23 '11 at 15:11
    
is that name is 'literal notation'? –  mjk6026 Jul 23 '11 at 15:18
    
The literal notation in many languages is that strings of characters are enclosed in "" (quotation marks). Further, a single character can be expressed in terms of its numerical value, represented hexadecimally, using the character literal \xNN. So you've written three strings consisting of one character each, respectively of values 60, 61 and 62. –  Kerrek SB Jul 23 '11 at 15:31
    
i found a answer. name of above syntax is "Standard Numeric Format Strings" : msdn.microsoft.com/en-ca/library/dwhawy9k%28v=vs.95%29.aspx thanks. –  mjk6026 Jul 23 '11 at 15:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It is used in literals in e.g. programming languages. wikipedia knows it

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i found a answer. name of above syntax is "Standard Numeric Format Strings" : msdn.microsoft.com/en-ca/library/dwhawy9k%28v=vs.95%29.aspx thanks. –  mjk6026 Jul 23 '11 at 15:39

It's not an encoding in the sense of a character encoding (e.g. UTF-8, ANSI, etc.). It's the syntax used to express hexadecimal character literals in many programming languages.

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i found a answer. name of above syntax is "Standard Numeric Format Strings" : msdn.microsoft.com/en-ca/library/dwhawy9k%28v=vs.95%29.aspx thanks. –  mjk6026 Jul 23 '11 at 15:39
    
If you read the MSDN article you linked to, you'll see that the so called "Standard Numeric Format Strings" are something altogether different. –  Ferruccio Feb 6 '13 at 13:06

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