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i need to read an integer through a socket and the sens it to a function. i do

strcpy(out,"insert id messagge\n");
if (write(sd_client,out, sizeof(out))==-1){
    printf("Error.\n");
    }
while ((read(sd_client, &id, sizeof(int)))==-1){  //id is an integer
        if(errno!=EINTR){
    printf("Error.\n");
        exit(-1);
    }
}
messaggio2(sd_client, logi, atoi(id)); //atoi(id) try to send int to func

someone can help me please? :D

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How are you sending the integer ? –  cnicutar Jul 23 '11 at 15:53
    
What error are you seeing? –  Peter K. Jul 23 '11 at 15:54
    
If sd_client is a TCP socket, then you can't be guaranteed that "read" will return all the bytes you ask for. See this answer I gave before. stackoverflow.com/questions/5125286/… –  selbie Jul 23 '11 at 16:56

2 Answers 2

The second parameter of read and write is a pointer to the data.

When you say:

write(sd_client,out, sizeof(out))

you're passing the value of out. That should be:

write(sd_client, &out, sizeof(out))

Also, I think that you've declared id as int (which is correct), so why are you passing it to atoi? That function is for parsing a int from a string.

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out is a char out[256] –  GixPix Jul 23 '11 at 16:19
    
i use atoi, but it doesn't work, that's why i'm asking for help. i try different way, that is just the least one. In final i need to read an integer through a socket and than see if it's the same of another int –  GixPix Jul 23 '11 at 16:22
1  
write(sd_client, out, sizeof(out)) is writing all of out. read(sd_client, &id, sizeof(int)) is reading bytes into id to form an int. As I said, atoi takes a string and returns an int, for example, atoi("123") returns 123. You're trying to pass it an int. –  MRAB Jul 23 '11 at 16:47

The problem you're having seems a bit vague since you haven't actually mentioned the errors you're getting, but from the code you have posted, it seems like you are running into two different problems:

  1. atoi() is for converting a string value to an integer ... now it seems you already have an integer in the value of id, so the argument to atoi() is incorrect. You would simply need to use something like sprintf() or snprintf() to convert your integer value to a string value and then copy that into a user-defined string-buffer if you are wanting a string-representation of your integer.
  2. You are working with sockets, therefore any information transferred over the network will be coming in network-byte-order. If you are on a little-endian platform, then the integer will be coming in a big-endian format, and you will be interpreting the value of your integer incorrect. Therefore you should be converting your integer to the native platform endian format using a function like ntohl() which can be found inside of the header file netinet/in.h

So for instance:

#include <netinet/in.h>

int id;
int sd_client;

//... code to open socket, etc.

//add your own error-checking ... stripped out here for simplicity's sake
read(sd_client, &id, sizeof(int));
id = ntohl(id);

char buffer[32];
snprintf(buffer, sizeof(buffer), "%d", id);
messaggio2(sd_client, logi, buffer);
share|improve this answer
    
i don't want a string, i need an integer. making the read whit &id doesn't work. now whit this code –  GixPix Jul 23 '11 at 18:13
    
while ((read(sd_client, &id, sizeof(int)))==-1){ if(errno!=EINTR){ printf("Errore in lettura.\n"); exit(-1); } } printf("%d\n",id); id = ntohl(id); printf("%d\n",id); –  GixPix Jul 23 '11 at 18:13
    
if the client write 4 the first print is 52. after the ntohl i make the same print and value is 8572415232. I need that id value is 4 after the read in this case, not 52 or the other –  GixPix Jul 23 '11 at 18:16
    
On the client side you need to also call 'htonl()' before sending the 'int' value of '4' –  Jason Jul 23 '11 at 21:28
    
Also make sure that read returned 4 bytes –  Jason Jul 23 '11 at 21:31

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