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I have a question about copying rows in PostgreSQL. My table hierarchy is quite complex, where many tables are linked to each other via foreign keys. For the sake of simplicity, I will explain my question with two tables, but please bear in mind that my question is targeted on a hierarchy with lots of tables with lots of correlation between the tables. In essence, I am looking for a (probably less optimal) solution which excludes the need for writing too much queries by hand.

Say I have the following two tables:

table A
(
    integer identifier primary key
    ... -- other fields
);

table B
(
    integer identifier primary key
    integer a          foreign key references A (identifier)
    ... -- other fields
);

Say A and B hold the following rows:

A(1)

B(1, 1)
B(2, 1)

My question is: I would like to create a copy of a row in A such that the related rows in B are also copied into a new row. This would give:

A(1)    -- the old row
A(2)    -- the new row

B(1, 1) -- the old row
B(2, 1) -- the old row
B(3, 2) -- the new row
B(4, 2) -- the new row

Basically I am looking for a COPY/INSERT CASCADE.

Is there a neat trick to achieve this more or less automatically? Maybe by using temporary tables?

I believe that if I have to write all the INSERT INTO ... FROM ... queries myself in the correct order and stuff, I might go mental.

update

Let's answer my own question ;)

I did some try-outs with the RULE mechanisms in PostgreSQL and this is what I came up with:

First, the table definitions:

drop table if exists A cascade;
drop table if exists B cascade;

create table A
(
        identifier              serial                  not null                primary key,
        name                    varchar                 not null
);

create table B
(
        identifier              serial                  not null                primary key,
        name                    varchar                 not null,
        a                       integer                 not null                references A (identifier)
);

Next, for each table, we create a function and corresponding rule which translates UPDATE into INSERT.

create function A(in A, in A) returns integer as
$$
        declare
                r integer;
        begin
                -- A
                if ($1.identifier <> $2.identifier) then
                        insert into A (identifier, name) values ($2.identifier, $2.name) returning identifier into r;
                else
                        insert into A (name) values ($2.name) returning identifier into r;
                end if;

                -- B
                update B set a = r where a = $1.identifier;

                return r;
        end;
$$ language plpgsql;

create rule A as on update to A do instead select A(old, new);

create function B(in B, in B) returns integer as
$$
        declare
                r integer;
        begin
                if ($1.identifier <> $2.identifier) then
                        insert into B (identifier, name, a) values ($2.identifier, $2.name, $2.a) returning identifier into r;
                else
                        insert into B (name, a) values ($2.name, $2.a) returning identifier into r;
                end if;

                return r;
        end;
$$ language plpgsql;

create rule B as on update to B do instead select B(old, new);

Finally, some testings:

insert into A (name)    values ('test_1');
insert into B (name, a) values ('test_1_child', (select identifier from a where name = 'test_1'));

update A set name = 'test_2', identifier = identifier + 50;
update A set name = 'test_3';

select * from A, B where B.a = A.identifier;

This seems to work quite fine. Any comments?

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Were you simply looking for a pure Cartesian product? If so, you wouldn't have had to go through the hassle, but could have joined A to B without using an ON clause. –  Kenaniah Aug 17 '11 at 18:41

1 Answer 1

This will work. One thing I note you wisely avoided was DO ALSO rules on inserts and updates. DO ALSO with insert and update is pretty dangerous so avoid that at pretty much all cost.

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