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I'm trying to create a LINQ provider. I'm using the guide LINQ: Building an IQueryable provider series, and I have added the code up to LINQ: Building an IQueryable Provider - Part IV.

I am getting a feel of how it is working and the idea behind it. Now I'm stuck on a problem, which isn't a code problem but more about the understanding.

I'm firing off this statement:

QueryProvider provider = new DbQueryProvider();
Query<Customer> customers = new Query<Customer>(provider);

int i = 3;
var newLinqCustomer = customers.Select(c => new { c.Id, c.Name}).Where(p => p.Id == 2 | p.Id == i).ToList();

Somehow the code, or expression, knows that the Where comes before the Select. But how and where?

There is no way in the code that sorts the expression, in fact the ToString() in debug mode, shows that the Select comes before the Where.

I was trying to make the code fail. Normal I did the Where first and then the Select.

So how does the expression sort this? I have not done any change to the code in the guide.

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What do you mean “where comes before the select”? You mean in the generated SQL? –  svick Jul 23 '11 at 17:42
    
The only thing I can think of is that maybe you're seeing the generated SQL has the SELECT and WHERE reordered? In which case I'd guess that there's an optimisation step somewhere in the Linq2Sql provider that takes SELECT Id, Name FROM (SELECT Id, Name FROM Customer WHERE Id=2 || Id=@i) and converts it to SELECT Id, Name FROM Customer WHERE Id=2 || Id=@i - but is this what you're seeing and is it what you are asking? –  Stuart Jul 23 '11 at 19:58
    
You know of re-linq, right? You aren't reinventing the wheel I hope :-) –  xanatos Oct 9 '11 at 7:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The expressions are "interpreted", "translated" or "executed" in the order you write them - so the Where does not come before the Select


If you execute: var newLinqCustomer = customers.Select(c => new { c.Id, c.Name}).Where(p => p.Id == 2 | p.Id == i).ToList();

then the Where is executed on the IEnumerable or IQueryable of the anonymous type.


If you execute:

        var newLinqCustomer = customers.Where(p => p.Id == 2 | p.Id == i).Select(c => new { c.Id, c.Name}).ToList();

then the Where is executed on the IEnumerable or IQueryable of the customer type.


The only thing I can think of is that maybe you're seeing some generated SQL where the SELECT and WHERE have been reordered? In which case I'd guess that there's an optimisation step somewhere in the (e.g.) LINQ to SQL provider that takes SELECT Id, Name FROM (SELECT Id, Name FROM Customer WHERE Id=2 || Id=@i) and converts it to SELECT Id, Name FROM Customer WHERE Id=2 || Id=@i - but this must be a provider specific optimisation.

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I don't understand the answer. What's the different between “executed on IQueryable” and “executed in LinqToSQL”? –  svick Jul 23 '11 at 21:10
    
Sorry - tidied it up now. As I said in my comment on the question, I can only imagine the OP is seeing some optimisation performed in whichever linq provider he is currently looking at - but we don't have that detail from his question. –  Stuart Jul 23 '11 at 21:26
    
If the select filter i fired before the where, I must be enable to see it in the code, by a break-point, but I cant. You say that, if I do the select first,then the where is do on the anonymous type, but there is no method call with the name Select how can that be ? I –  Dennis Larsen Jul 26 '11 at 7:25
    
For Linq2Objects I think you might be able to see the filter executed using breakpoints. For Linq2Sql, however, the filter isn't executed in code but instead is converted to Sql - so a breakpoint won't work. –  Stuart Jul 26 '11 at 9:25
    
Sorry - not sure I understand your question about "no method call with the name Select how can that be? I" - did it get cut short? –  Stuart Jul 26 '11 at 9:26

No, in the general case (such as LINQ to Objects) the select will be executed before the where statement. Think of it is a pipeline, your first step is a transformation, the second a filter. Not the other way round, as it would be the case if you wrote Where...Select.

Now, a LINQ Provider has the freedom to walk the expression tree and optimize it as it sees fit. Be aware that you may not change the semantics of the expression though. This means that a smart LINQ to SQL provider would try to pull as many where clauses it can into the SQL query to reduce the amount of data travelling over the network. However, keep the example from Stuart in mind: Not all query providers are clever, partly because ruling out side effects from query reordering is not as easy as it seems.

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I don't think that your first paragraph is correct. The Select and Where clauses are just projections and filters and, to preserve semantics, they must occur in the order given. There's no "general case" that one occurs before the other. It's in whatever order that the original query was written in. –  Enigmativity Oct 9 '11 at 7:59

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