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Declaring template function friends involves some incredibly unintuitive syntax, even for C++! What is the rationale behind the choice of syntax for the extra <> needed? Wouldn't it make more sense to use the template keyword?

For those that don't know about this, here is an example of what you might try to do:

template <typename T>
class Foo
{
  int x;
  friend void bar(Foo<T>);
};

template <typename T>
void bar(Foo<T> f)
{
  std::cout << f.x;
}

If you try to call bar(Foo<T>()), you will get linker errors.

To solve this, you have to forward declare bar (and therefore Foo) and then stick an oddly placed <> in the friend declaration.

template <typename T> class Foo;
template <typename T> void bar(Foo<T>);

template <typename T>
class Foo
{
  int x;
  friend void bar<>(Foo<T>); // note the <> (!?)
};

template <typename T>
void bar(Foo<T> f)
{
    std::cout << f.x;
}

My question is, what is the rationale behind the <> syntax? Wouldn't it be more intuitive to use the template keyword or something along those lines?

EDIT: To clarify, I already know why the <> is required, what I want to know is why they chose to use <> to disambiguate it instead of some other more intuitive syntax.

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1  
+1 I have been wondering this for a long time. There's a discussion in "Effective C++" on this, but I didn't quite get it. –  templatetypedef Jul 23 '11 at 20:27
1  
I hope this unintuitive thing become intuitive in c++11 –  user72424 Jul 23 '11 at 20:32
1  
@Hades: Unless I missed it, nothing has changed in this regard for C++11. –  Peter Alexander Jul 23 '11 at 20:36

2 Answers 2

Wait. You are not declare a friend template. You declare a specialization of a template as friend! As such, why would you want to put a template clause there?

The syntax to name specializations of function templates is by teplateName<ArgumentList>, and that is what you shall use according to the Standard in the friend declarations.

If you want to befriend the whole template and all specializations generated and explicitly specialized, you can still do that, and then you can use a template clause

template<typename U>
friend void bar(Foo<U>);
share|improve this answer
    
If the syntax is based on specialisation then why isn't the syntax: template <> friend void bar<T>(Foo<T>);? Why do I put an empty list of template parameters without a template keyword? –  Peter Alexander Jul 23 '11 at 23:04
    
@Peter well, template<> friend void bar<T>(Foo<T>); looks to me like an explicit specialization (template<> is only used to declare explicit specializations). But the friend declaration you wrote in your question doesn't require the existence of an explicit specialization of the template. It befriends also instantiations of the template. I can imagine this was the rationale for not using template<> - people may be mislead in thinking that it would declare an explicit specialization. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jul 23 '11 at 23:07
    
@Peter perhaps I should clarify, when I say "You declare a specialization of a template as friend", I use the term that the Standard defines "specialization" to mean. Not what most of the C++ developers use it for. There are generated specializations, which the compiler creates for you by instantiating a template. And there are explicit specializations that the programmer creates and where no instantiation needs to happen. My use of the term didn't specify any of the two kinds in particular. Using template<> in a declaration introduces an explicit specialization. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jul 23 '11 at 23:19
    
I see what you mean, but I'm still not convinced that the chosen syntax is most intuitive :-) Why not friend template void bar(Foo<T>);? –  Peter Alexander Jul 23 '11 at 23:25
1  
@Peter template<typename T> void f(T) { } void f(int) { }. For calling the template, you need to say f<>(0). Otherwise it will call the non-template. Another one: struct A { template<typename T> void f(T); void f(int); }; template<> void A::f(int);. This code is ill-formed (though accepted by GCC and Clang, but they are indeed allowing illegal code here. Comeau strictly rejects this). To refer to the member template and specialize it, you need to say A::f<>(int) instead. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jul 24 '11 at 0:09

Quoting this page:

The non-template function is called because a non-template function takes precedence in overload resolution.

So my guess the friend void bar<>(Foo<T>); is intuitive because you want to make sure it's the template function you are calling and not an overload for Foo<T>. There would otherwise no way for the compiler to notice if the templated or the non-templated function is the class'es friend.

Why the <> syntax is used and not the template syntax is not clear to me.

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Thanks, but it's the part about <> vs. template that I want to know :-) –  Peter Alexander Jul 23 '11 at 20:46
    
@Peter Alexander: Ah, but I'll leave my answer in for now, it might inspire someone more knowledgable than me of C++ to the real answer. –  nightcracker Jul 23 '11 at 20:51

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