Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Let's say I have a mastertable (table1) with a detailtable (table2). There can be multiple detail records for each masterrecord. Now I want a query that counts all detailrecords for each masterrecord :

SELECT t1.id, count(t2.*)
FROM table1 as t1
LEFT JOIN table2 AS t2 ON t2.id=t1.id
GROUP BY t1.id

This gives me exactly the same number of records as table1 has.

But when I add a WHERE statement to only count the records that have a checkfield that's higher than 0, I don't get all records in table1 anymore! The ones with no matching detailrecords are now left out completely. Why is this happening?

SELECT t1.id, count(t2.*)
FROM table1 as t1
LEFT JOIN table2 AS t2 ON t2.id=t1.id
WHERE t2.checkfield != 0
GROUP BY t1.id

(Maybe something else is wrong in my real query, since I tried to simplify it for this example, but I think I got it right)

share|improve this question
    
Changing the WHERE to AND works... Thanks to Nick, should have thought of that myself :) Still don't understand though why it didn't work with a WHERE statement that checks NULL... Maybe because of the GROUP BY ? –  Dylan Jul 23 '11 at 20:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The WHERE clause restricts the joined results which are being aggregated over, so while you're trying do an outer join, only those rows with t2.checkfield != 0 survive, but that excludes all the unmatched rows!

On the other hand, when you change WHERE to AND, you now have tab1 LEFT OUTER JOIN tab2 ON(tab1.id = tab2.t1_id AND some_condition) -- but this is still an outer join, i.e. records on the left which have no match on the right will be included.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.