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I have 4 classes in PHP I use to signup a user, problem is I don't know how to close the mysql connection.

Class calls:

single_connect->database->post->signup

When I implement mysql_close() in the singleton it breaks my code. My assumption is that as long as a signup object is created the classes it extends from are also "instantiated". But this does not appear to be the case.

I had to comment out the mysql_close to allow this to work. Note that my singleton uses the database link to determine if it exists wrather then a pointer to itself like most Singletons.

/*single_connect*/

class single_connect
  {
  private static $_db_pointer = NULL;
  private function __destruct() 
    {
    //mysql_close();
    }
  private function __construct()
    {
    self::$_db_pointer = mysql_connect(DB_HOST, DB_USER, DB_PASS);
    mysql_select_db(DB_DATABASE);
    }
  public static function get_connection()
    {
    if(self::$_db_pointer == NULL)
      {
      return new self();
      } 
    }
  }

/*database*/

abstract class database
  {
  protected function __construct()
    {
    single_connect::get_connection();
    }
  protected static function query($query)
    {
    $result = mysql_query($query) or die(mysql_error());
    return $result;
    }
  }

/*post*/

class post extends database
  {
  public $_protected_arr=array();
  protected function __construct()
    {
    parent::__construct();
    $this->protect();
    }
  protected function protect()
    {
    foreach($_POST as $key => $value)
      {
      $this->_protected_arr[$key] = mysql_real_escape_string($value);
      }
    }
  }

/*signup*/

class signup extends post 
  { 
 ...
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2  
Why are you closing the connection at all? –  prodigitalson Jul 23 '11 at 21:40
    
You normally close the mysql connection if you don't need it any longer. When will that be the case for your scenario? –  hakre Jul 23 '11 at 21:40
1  
No, one normally does not close the connection in PHP as it is not needed, because the request finishes soon, as it has been said. –  TMS Jul 23 '11 at 21:55
    
Nice OOP programming and I disagree that you should not close the connection. If you are using a persistent connection then there is no need to close it. But otherwise closing it yourself it, IMO, good practice. –  Alan B. Dee Jul 23 '11 at 22:03
    
@Alan: its a horrible idea unless it is reopened automatically. You can never be sure where a query will be issued from or by what object so you should not be closing the connection until just before the script finishes. Since this is handled automatically theres no reason to manually do it. Now freeing statements and result sets you often need to do but thats completely different. –  prodigitalson Jul 24 '11 at 0:51
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Connections are automagically being closed when script execution finishes. So if there is no tremendous amount of time between the last database operation and the end of the script I would not bother to explicitly close the connection.

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I found the problem. In my explanation about Singleton classes and static properties I checked how PHP handles static properties.

"Like any other PHP static variable, static properties may only be initialized using a literal or constant; expressions are not allowed. So while you may initialize a static property to an integer or array (for instance), you may not initialize it to another variable, to a function return value, or to an object." http://php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.static.php

You cannot set the static property as an object like you can in C++, Java or most other OOP languages. In this case the connection was being closed when the class was GC'ed.

My apologies to prodigitalson, I was incorrect in my comments.

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