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I'm setting up a log system for my (2d) game engine, and it should be able to write lines to a file.

The point is, writing to the disc is not instantaneous. If the file writing (basically, the file.flush()) is done in the thread who is calling the Trace.Write(), will it hang while the file is being written ?

If it is the case, then it would be interesting to create a thread used only to write the log lines to the log file, while the processing thread would continue what it is doing.

Same question with the console (while I'm here...).

The question is :

"Is it interesting in a calculation intensive program, to thread the console and/or file writing ?"

Thank you.

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3 Answers 3

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Yes, your thread may be suspended while it is in a IOWAIT state. This is a classical suspend situation.

If it is a good idea to create a thread only responsible for writing logfile entries depends on your code. Is it I/O bound? Then it might be a good idea. Is your code CPU bound? Then it won't help much. Is it neither? Then it doesn't matter.

The best way to figure this out is to analyze your code and benchmark the two versions.

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It's for a game engine, so it's CPU bound, without any doubts. I thing I'll go the threading way, to run as fast as possible, without the writing operation slowing the whole thing down. Anyway, the rest of the program don't care to know if it the log has been written or not. Thanks for your insight. –  Clement Bellot Jul 23 '11 at 23:05

If you queue off the log writes to a dedicated logging thread, there are many advantages. The big disadvantage is that the logging will almost certainly not have happened when your log call returns. If the problem you are trying to catch is is a disastrous crash, the log entry that identifies the bug may not get written at all.

Is it interesting in a calculation intensive program, to thread the console and/or file writing ?

In general, given the caveat above, probably yes:

See also:

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Yes, that is a problem if the thread is directly linked to the program. Do you know if you can catch the OS signals for the SEGFAULT (for example) ? It might allow to hang until the thread have finished the writing. –  Clement Bellot Jul 23 '11 at 23:11
    
If losing data due to a segfault is your concern, you can always memory-map a file. The OS will write the mapped area back to disk even if your process crashes. The only way of preventing it from doing that is crashing the operating system or pulling the power cord. But frankly, printf with stdout pointing to a file has always been working nicely for me, with no performance issues whatsoever... –  Damon Jul 24 '11 at 21:08

If the file writing (basically, the file.flush()) is done in the thread who is calling the Trace.Write(), will it hang while the file is being written ?

Yes. This is because the flush() call is designed to ensure the data hits the disk.

If it is the case, then it would be interesting to create a thread used only to write the log lines to the log file, while the processing thread would continue what it is doing.

Why not just stop calling flush()? If you're not interested in making absolutely sure that, by a certain part of the program, all the data written so far is on the disk, just stop calling flush() manually, and it'll get buffered and written out in the usual efficient manner.

Ultimately there might be some small benefit of having the log writes in another thread, if the disk writing system requires periodic syncs that hang the thread (which I'm not confident is the case), but I would expect that you lose far more than you gain by having to implement synchronisation on however you pass your loggable strings to the background thread. Then you start getting into wondering whether you can use a lock-free queue or some other complex system when really you probably just needed to do it the simple way in the first place - write whenever you like, only flush when absolutely necessary.

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The idea with calling flush() is that if the program happen to crash for X or Y, the log is written, and there is no data loss. –  Clement Bellot Jul 25 '11 at 10:49
    
Of course - but that benefit is lost if you put this in a different thread because you don't know when that thread is going to reach the flush() statement. You don't even know if that thread is going to attempt to write out the data at all before the program crashes. –  Kylotan Jul 25 '11 at 11:28

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