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I need two threads to progress in a "tick tock" pattern. When implmented with a semaphore this looks fine:

Semaphore tick_sem(1);
Semaphore tock_sem(0);

void ticker( void )
{
   while( true )
   {
      P( tick_sem );
      do_tick();
      V( tock_sem );
   }
}

void tocker( void )
{
   while( true )
   {
      P( tock_sem );
      do_tock();
      V( tick_sem );
   }
}

However, if I do the same thing with a mutex ( which is technically a binary semaphore ), it has an odd code smell.

std::mutex tick_mutex;
std::mutex tock_mutex;
tock_mutex.lock();

void ticker( void )
{
   while( true )
   {
      tick_mutex.lock();
      do_tick();
      tock_mutex.unlock();
   }
}

void tocker( void )
{
   while( true )
   {
      tock_mutex.lock()
      do_tock();
      tick_mutex.unlock();
   }
}

I think the smell is that a mutex isn't meant to convey information to another thread. (The c++11 standard committee added a spurious fail to try_lock to defeat unexpected information transfer; §30.4.1/14.) It seems like mutexes are meant to synchronize access to a variable, which can then convey information to another thread.

Lastly, when implemented with a std::condition_variable, it looks correct but it's more complicated ( a tick_vs_tock variable, a mutex, and a condition variable). I've omitted the implementation for brevity, but it's really straight forward.

Is the mutex solution fine? Or is there something subtly wrong with it?

Is there a good pattern for solving my tick/tock problem that I haven't thought of?

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BTW: this issue only arose because C++0x doesn't have a std::semaphore and the double std::mutex solution is less complicated than the std::condition_variable solution. –  deft_code Jul 23 '11 at 23:54
3  
(Why) is it even valid to unlock() a mutex in a thread that doesn't currently hold it? –  Steve Jessop Jul 24 '11 at 0:02
    
@Steve that is really good question (hint, hint, nudge, nudge). –  deft_code Jul 24 '11 at 0:10
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2 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

A Mutex is not simply just a binary semaphore, it also has the limitation that only the locking thread is allowed to unlock it.

You are breaking that rule.

Edit:

From MSDN:

The ReleaseMutex function fails if the calling thread does not own the mutex object.

From some site that google turned up for pthread_mutex_unlock:

The pthread_mutex_unlock() function may fail if:

EPERM The current thread does not own the mutex.

And you will find the same on other mutex implementations. It makes sense because a mutex is supposed to guard a thread's access to a resource, so another thread should not be able to unlock it.

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As per Steve's comment. Is that really a rule? It's definitely a good idea. –  deft_code Jul 24 '11 at 0:13
    
@deft - I think it depends on the implementation of the mutex, which is system-dependent. It is generally not a good idea to unlock someone else's mutex, even if it is allowed by the system. –  littleadv Jul 24 '11 at 0:16
    
@deft_code: I haven't read the mutex section of the FDIS yet, but I'd be astonished if it isn't a rule. Mutexes have an owner, it's part of their fundamental definition as a synchronization tool. –  Steve Jessop Jul 24 '11 at 0:18
    
@deft_code: Yes, that's the rule. See edit. –  Fozi Jul 24 '11 at 0:19
2  
Here we are, 30.1.4.2/22: "Requires: the calling thread shall own the mutex". So UB if it doesn't. –  Steve Jessop Jul 24 '11 at 0:20
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Since you have a case to use a semaphore, I think the fix is to portably implement one using a mutex and a condition variable.

This might not be especially efficient (since it'll use a mutex/condvar pair per semaphore), but you can switch in an alternate implementation on systems that have their own semaphores (such as Posix and Windows).

Apparently semaphores are "too error-prone". With all due respect to Boost, I think at least some of us can manage. Certainly you can tie yourself in knots trying to do complicated things with multiple semaphores, and they are a pretty low-level tool. But when they're the right thing, no problem.

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I agree that the "too error prone" thing is weird. Mutexes can be error prone too. So can a hammer. –  asveikau Jul 24 '11 at 0:26
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