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I'm trying to learn about regular expressions but am not doing so well after reading through the java tutorial.

This program is supposed to take an imput in the format:

a) add dd dd together b) subtract 05 from 13 c) add 02 to 03

And return the dd (+ or -) dd = answer

The (wrong) way I set this up is to have the prog try to find either of the 3 matches, and continue to do so until the user inputs "bye." If there isn't a match it should just prompt the user for an input again.

Here's my code! With exactly 100 errors. :/ If anyone can help me with the syntax, it'd really be appreciated!

 import java.util.*;
    import java.util.regex.Pattern;
    import java.util.regex.Matcher;

    class Calculator {
      public static void main(String[] args){
        Scanner imp = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.println("yes> ");
        String s = imp.nextLine();

        if (s.equals("bye")) {
          System.exit(0);
      }

        while (true) {

          Pattern p = Pattern.compile(s); //compile string, check for formats

          Matcher x = p.matcher(\badd\b\s\d\d\s\d\d\s\btogether\b); //format add 12 12 together
          Matcher y = p.matcher(\bsubtract\b\s\d\d\s\d\d\s\bfrom\b); //format subtract 05 from 13
          Matcjer z = p.matcher(\badd\b\s\d\d\s\bto\b\s\d\d); //format add 02 to 03

          boolean b = p.matches;

          boolean l = x.matches;
          boolean i = y.matches;
          boolean g = z.matches; 

          if (l.equals(true))
            return (\d\d " + " \d\d " = " \d\d+\d\d);
          else if (i.equals(true))
            return (\d\d " + " \d\d " = " \d\d-\d\d);
          else if (g.equals(true))
            return (\d\d " + " \d\d " = " \d\d+\d\d);
        }
      }
    }
share|improve this question
5  
The compiler stops emitting errors after 100. There may be more :) –  Cameron Skinner Jul 24 '11 at 0:26
    
LOL. great news cameron. –  mdegges Jul 24 '11 at 0:53
2  
The good news is that one mistake can generate many compiler errors, so you probably have much less than 100 genuine errors :) –  Cameron Skinner Jul 24 '11 at 1:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

ugh where to begin...

first off Pattern.compile() is expecting the regex (the format strings) while matcher() expects the string to test against

@Samir has shown you what was wrong with the regexes in the code itself (I edited them a bit for more clarity)

l.matches needs ()

you cannot call methods on primitive boolean variables if(b) is sufficient to test if it is true or not

and to get specific submatches you need to use capturing groups

to concatenate strings together you can use +

to output something to the console System.out.println should be used not return

with the most obvious errors solved:

import java.util.*;
import java.util.regex.Pattern;
import java.util.regex.Matcher;

class Calculator {
  public static void main(String[] args){
    Scanner imp = new Scanner(System.in);
    System.out.println("yes> ");


    while (true) {
      String s = imp.nextLine();//put getting the input inside the loop or it's infinite

      if (s.equals("bye")) {
          System.exit(0);
      }

      Matcher x = Pattern.compile("add\\s(\\d+)\\s(\\d+)\\stogether").matcher(s); //format add 12 12 together
      Matcher y = Pattern.compile("subtract\\s(\\d+)\\sfrom\\s(\\d+)").matcher(s); //format subtract 05 from 13
      Matcjer z = Pattern.compile("add\\s(\\d+)\\sto\\s(\\d+)").matcher(s); //format add 02 to 03


      boolean l = x.matches();
      boolean i = y.matches();
      boolean g = z.matches(); 

      if (l){
        System.out.println(l.group(1) + " + " + l.group(2) + " = " + 
             (Integer.parseInt(l.group(1))+Integer.parseInt(l.group(2))) );
      }else if (i){
        System.out.println(i.group(1) + " - " + i.group(2) + " = " + 
             (Integer.parseInt(i.group(1))+Integer.parseInt(i.group(2))) );
      }else if (g){
        System.out.println(g.group(1) + " + " + g.group(2) + " = " + 
             (Integer.parseInt(g.group(1))+Integer.parseInt(g.group(2))) );
      }
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for showing how to implement grouping & use it to parse the string. Very very helpful. –  mdegges Jul 24 '11 at 1:04
    
just a little edit that took me awhile to figure out: 1. this way works if you only want the user to enter digits in the format dd +/- dd. to tweak it so that any number of digits can be entered, the format needs to change to ("add\\s(.*)\\stogether") & then a second regex is needed to search for just digits. 2. when printing, it should be matcherVariable.group(number). –  mdegges Jul 28 '11 at 15:11
    
@michele you can also use (\d+) if you want 1 or more digits check the new regexes in the code –  ratchet freak Jul 28 '11 at 15:23
    
I was using (\\d*), which lets you enter any number of digits. But the problem is that I originally wanted to add/subtract an unlimited amount of number's together. If the user inputs: add 10 202222 02 20 503 230 40 300000000000 3240 348 340 249 together, this won't work. It only handles 2 numbers. –  mdegges Aug 4 '11 at 19:39

Have you tried looking at your code in an IDE such as Eclipse or IntelliJ IDEA? They'll highlight the errors for you. The main one I'm seeing is that you're not putting the regular expressions in strings. Java doesn't have native regexes, so you'll need to supply them as strings. Here's an example:

Matcher x = p.matcher("\\badd\\b\\s\\d\\d\\s\\d\\d\\s\\btogether\\b"); //format add 12 12 together

Notice how I've doubled up the backslashes. This is because it's the escape character in Java as well as in regexes. The compiler will interpret the above string as \badd\b\s\d\d\s\d\d\s\btogether\b, and then the regular expression parser will interpret the escape characters properly.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Didn't realize I needed quotes or another set of \'s. –  mdegges Jul 24 '11 at 0:30
    
I'm mainly using dr java and the cmd line. But sometimes I'll get an error (now I'm getting "cannot find symbol matches") and I don't know how to fix it. I have just been editing code right from the tutorial and 'x.matches' worked fine in their regex program. –  mdegges Jul 24 '11 at 0:32

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