Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say that on the C++ side my function takes a variable of type jstring named myString. I can convert it to an ANSI string as follows:

const char* ansiString = env->GetStringUTFChars(myString, 0);

is there a way of getting

const wchar_t* unicodeString = ...

share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

If this helps someone... I've used this function for an Android project:

std::wstring Java_To_WStr(JNIEnv *env, jstring string)
{
    std::wstring value;

    const jchar *raw = env->GetStringChars(string, 0);
    jsize len = env->GetStringLength(string);
    const jchar *temp = raw;
    while (len > 0)
    {
        value += *(temp++);
        len--;
    }
    env->ReleaseStringChars(string, raw);

    return value;
}

An improved solution could be (Thanks for the feedback):

std::wstring Java_To_WStr(JNIEnv *env, jstring string)
{
    std::wstring value;

    const jchar *raw = env->GetStringChars(string, 0);
    jsize len = env->GetStringLength(string);
    const jchar *temp = raw;

    value.assign(raw, raw + len);

    env->ReleaseStringChars(string, raw);

    return value;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Neat, though I suspect loading the wstring with a buffer in one go would be more efficient that one character at a time. –  Rup Feb 2 '12 at 9:21
    
Yep, I also think so. I've just updated my answer :) –  gergonzalez Feb 7 '12 at 8:42

A portable and robust solution is to use iconv, with the understanding that you have to know what encoding your system wchar_t uses (UTF-16 on Windows, UTF-32 on many Unix systems, for example).

If you want to minimise your dependency on third-party code, you can also hand-roll your own UTF-8 converter. This is easy if converting to UTF-32, somewhat harder with UTF-16 because you have to handle surrogate pairs too. :-P Also, you must be careful to reject non-shortest forms, or it can open up security bugs in some cases.

share|improve this answer
    
You're suggesting converting the jstring to UTF-8 then back to UTF-16? Is that really necessary? –  Rup Jan 5 '12 at 13:01
    
@Rup jstrings already are UTF-8: "The JNI uses modified UTF-8 strings to represent various string types. Modified UTF-8 strings are the same as those used by the Java VM. Modified UTF-8 strings are encoded so that character sequences that contain only non-null ASCII characters can be represented using only one byte per character, but all Unicode characters can be represented.....The Java VM does not recognize the four-byte format of standard UTF-8; it uses its own two-times-three-byte format instead." –  b1nary.atr0phy May 23 '12 at 17:36
    
@b1naryatr0phy Really? jni.h on my system (both 1.6 and 1.7) has typedef unsigned short jchar; which looks more like UTF-16 to me. –  Rup May 24 '12 at 0:08
    
I must be misunderstanding something then, that quote was pulled directly from Oracle's documentation: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/guide/jni/spec/types.html Feel free to explain if you can, I'm still trying to wrap my head around this. –  b1nary.atr0phy May 24 '12 at 0:29

JNI has a GetStringChars() function as well. The return type is const jchar*, jchar is 16-bit on win32 so in a way that would be compatible with wchar_t. Not sure if it's real UTF-16 or something else...

share|improve this answer
    
Do you happen to know if jchar's byte ordering is compatible with the Win32 wchar_t one? It should be, but probably good to be sure. :-) –  Chris Jester-Young Sep 16 '08 at 2:13
    
jchar is typedef'ed to unsigned short. I haven't tried it myself but my guess would be "yes". –  Adam Mitz Sep 16 '08 at 2:19
    
char == jchar == unsigned 16 bits –  b1nary.atr0phy May 23 '12 at 17:10
    
char == unsigned 16 bits on which platform? –  Adam Mitz May 24 '12 at 0:22
    
To keep this a little less confusing, in this discussion "char" is the built-in data type in the ISO C and C++ languages, not in Java. –  Adam Mitz May 24 '12 at 2:59

And who frees wsz? I would recommend STL!

std::wstring JavaToWSZ(JNIEnv* env, jstring string)
{
    std::wstring value;
    if (string == NULL) {
        return value; // empty string
    }
    const jchar* raw = env->GetStringChars(string, NULL);
    if (raw != NULL) {
        jsize len = env->GetStringLength(string);
        value.assign(raw, len);
        env->ReleaseStringChars(string, raw);
    }
    return value;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Not a great solution unless using C++11 since the wstring will be returned by value. (Obviously post C++11 it'll be move constructed which would be efficient) –  Benj Jan 10 '12 at 9:13
3  
value.assign(raw, len); is not valid. I think it should be value.assign(raw, raw + len); but I haven't tested yet. –  mjaggard Apr 17 '12 at 9:17
    
Great - worked for me perfectly in a C# -> C++/CLI -> JNI -> Java application! –  bbqchickenrobot Aug 29 '12 at 21:29

I know this was asked a year ago, but I don't like the other answers so I'm going to answer anyway. Here's how we do it in our source:

wchar_t * JavaToWSZ(JNIEnv* env, jstring string)
{
    if (string == NULL)
        return NULL;
    int len = env->GetStringLength(string);
    const jchar* raw = env->GetStringChars(string, NULL);
    if (raw == NULL)
        return NULL;

    wchar_t* wsz = new wchar_t[len+1];
    memcpy(wsz, raw, len*2);
    wsz[len] = 0;

    env->ReleaseStringChars(string, raw);

    return wsz;
}

EDIT: This solution works well on platforms where wchar_t is 2 bytes, some platforms have a 4 byte wchar_t in which case this solution will not work.

share|improve this answer
1  
This solution is wrong. I sucked 12 hours because of that. wchar_t and jchar are not necessary the same. The proof for that is the output of my test program: 01-26 20:28:43.675: E/[LMI-NATIVE](9280): len: 7, jchar: 2, wchar: 4 –  Kobor42 Jan 26 '12 at 19:32
2  
@Kobor42 - What does your test program do? Are you saying that you found an instance where wchar_t was 4 bytes? I didn't actually realise it but this function was designed to run (primarily) on Windows where wchar_t is always 2. I now realise wchar_t is compiler specific and may be different on your platform. –  Benj Jan 26 '12 at 21:54
    
Exactly. On Android prior 2.1 wchar_t is 1 byte. 2.1 and after is 4 bytes. –  Kobor42 May 18 '12 at 9:16
    
You're mixing potentially incompatible types. A Java jchar is always UTF-16. But wchar_t is not always UTF-16, sometimes it is UTF-32. In such cases you need to convert UTF-16 to UTF-32 (it's NOT just a matter of padding jchar to 4 bytes, see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UTF-16 for details). –  rustyx May 26 '12 at 20:27
    
I'm not mixing it. NDK is mixing it. I would like to convert java strings wihout information loss to c strings. –  Kobor42 Jul 12 '12 at 8:54

If we are not interested in cross platform-ability, in windows you can use the MultiByteToWideChar function, or the helpful macros A2W (ref. example).

share|improve this answer

Just use env->GetStringChars(myString, 0); Java pass Unicode by it's nature

share|improve this answer

Rather simple. But do not forget to free the memory by ReleaseStringChars

JNIEXPORT jboolean JNICALL Java_TestClass_test(JNIEnv * env, jobject, jstring string)
{
    const wchar_t * utf16 = (wchar_t *)env->GetStringChars(string, NULL);
    ...
    env->ReleaseStringChars(string, utf16);
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.