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I'm using Kohana 3.1 framework to do a simple validation using Kohana's ORM and Validation built in classes. Let's see the code...

In the model I have these simple rules:

public function rules()
{
  return array(
    'first_name' => array(
      array('not_empty'),
    ),
    'email' => array(
      array('not_empty'),
      array('email'),
    ),
  );
}

then in the controller I try to validate and save the object with the classic try ... catch construct:

try
{
    $t = array(
        'first_name'=>'pippo',
        'email'=>'foo@foo.com',
    );

    ORM::factory('customer')->values($t)->save();

}
catch ( ORM_Validation_Exception $e )
{
    die(Debug::vars($e->errors('')));
}

Now the $t array above should validate, but it doesn't. It instead throws an exception and dies calling Debug::vars and printing this error:

array(1) (
    "email" => string(23) "email must not be empty"
)

This is clearly not true, what I'm doing wrong?

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I was doing it WRONG on the relations side, actually field email column was on a foreign related table I haven't linked yet.. –  gpasci Jul 24 '11 at 4:01

1 Answer 1

So have you sorted it or not?

instead of:

$t = array(
  'first_name'=>'pippo',
  'email'=>'foo@foo.com',
);

ORM::factory('customer')->values($t)->save();

why don't you try:

$customer = ORM::factory('customer');

$customer->first_name = 'pippo';
$customer->email = 'foo@foo.com';

$customer->save();

Its a little bit more clean cut and explicit. Then you'd have never had any confusion on whether email was set, so you know to start looking else where. Just a thought.

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