Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two strings str1 and str2. Is there any algorithm that can be used in order to print out all interleavings of the two strings using recursion?

Update:

public class Interleave {


    private String resultString[] = new String[10];
    private String[] interStr(String str1, String str2){
    int n = ((Factorial.factorial(str1.length() + str2.length())) / (Factorial.factorial(str1.length()) * Factorial.factorial(str2.length())));
    //n is number of interleavings based on (str1.length()+str2.length())! / (str1.length()! * str2.length()!)
    if(str1.length() == 0){
        resultString[0] = str2;
        return resultString;
    }

    if(str2.length() == 0){
        resultString[0] = str1;
        return resultString;
    }

    else{
        for(int i = 0; i < n; i++){
            resultString[i]= str1.substring(0, 1) + interStr(str1.substring(1), str2.substring(1));

        }
    }
    return resultString;
}

    public static void main(String[] args) {
    Interleave obj = new Interleave();
    obj.interStr("12", "abc");
    for(int i = 0; i < obj.resultString.length; i ++){
        System.out.println(obj.resultString[i]);
    }

}

}
share|improve this question
    
@Mitch Wheat: I've tried different things but instead of trying to re-invent the wheel why not to use something much more meaningful? –  Nath Jul 24 '11 at 4:51
    
@Andrew Thompson: May I ask why was my post edited? –  Nath Jul 24 '11 at 4:51
    
because people expect to see that you have attempted to solve a problem yourself first, rather than you expecting someone to do it for you. Not to mention it looks alot like homework. –  Mitch Wheat Jul 24 '11 at 4:52
    
@Mitch Wheat: I do NOT want anybody to solve it for me. –  Nath Jul 24 '11 at 4:53
3  
How do you define "interleaving" of two strings? –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jul 24 '11 at 5:01

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The question simply asked whether a recursive algorithm exists for the problem, and the answer is yes. To find it, look for the base case and then for the "step".

The base case is when one of the two strings are empty:

  • interleave(s1, "") = {s1}

  • interleave("", s2) = {s2}

Notice the order of the arguments doesn't really matter, because

  • interleave("ab", "12") = {"ab12", "a1b2", "1ab2", "a12b", "1a2b", "12ab"} = interleave("12", "ab")

So since the order doesn't matter we'll look at recursing on the length of the first string.

Okay so let's see how one case leads to the next. I'll just use a concrete example, and you can generalize this to real code.

  • interleave("", "abc") = {"abc"}
  • interleave("1", "abc") = {"1abc", "a1bc", "ab1c", "abc1"}
  • interleave("12", "abc") = {"12abc", "1a2bc", "1ab2c", "1abc2", "a12bc", "a1b2c", "a1bc2", "ab12c", "ab1c2" "abc12"}

So everytime we added a character to the first string, we formed the new result set by adding the new character to all possible positions in the old result set. Let's look at exactly how we formed the third result above from the second. How did each element in the second result turn into elements in the third result when we added the "2"?

  • "1abc" => "12abc", "1a2bc", "1ab2c", "1abc2"
  • "a1bc" => "a12bc", "a1b2c", "a1bc2"
  • "ab1c" => "ab12c", "ab1c2"
  • "abc1" => "abc12"

Now look at things this way:

  • "1abc" => {1 w | w = interleave("2", "abc")}
  • "a1bc" => {a1 w | w = interleave("2", "bc")}
  • "ab1c" => {ab1 w | w = interleave("2", "c")}
  • "abc1" => {abc1 w | w = interleave("2", "")}

Although one or two examples doesn't prove a rule in general, in this case you should be able to infer what the rule is. You will have a loop, with recursive calls inside it.

This is actually a little more fun to do with pure functional programming, but you tagged the question with Java.

Hopefully this is a start for you. If you get stuck further you can do a web search for "interleaving strings" or "interleaving lists". There are some solutions out there.

EDIT:

Okay I just wrote the silly thing! It's a lot of fun to write these things in scripting languages, so I thought it would be great to see what it looked like in Java. Not as bad as I thought it would be! Here it is, packaged as an entire Java application.

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class Interleaver {

    /**
     * Returns a list containing all possible interleavings of two strings.
     * The order of the characters within the strings is preserved.
     */
    public static List<String> interleave(String s, String t) {
        List<String> result = new ArrayList<String>();
        if (t.isEmpty()) {
            result.add(s);
        } else if (s.isEmpty()) {
            result.add(t);
        } else {
            for (int i = 0; i <= s.length(); i++) {
                char c = t.charAt(0);
                String left = s.substring(0, i);
                String right = s.substring(i);
                for (String u : interleave(right, t.substring(1))) {
                    result.add(left + c + u);
                }
            }
        }
        return result;
    }

    /**
     * Prints some example interleavings to stdout.
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(interleave("", ""));
        System.out.println(interleave("a", ""));
        System.out.println(interleave("", "1"));
        System.out.println(interleave("a", "1"));
        System.out.println(interleave("ab", "1"));
        System.out.println(interleave("ab", "12"));
        System.out.println(interleave("abc", "12"));
        System.out.println(interleave("ab", "1234"));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the great explanation. I'll try it. –  Nath Jul 24 '11 at 5:43
1  
Hint: The notation {x w | w = f(y)} means the set of all strings made by concatenating x to each of the strings returned by calling f(y). It will turn into a for loop. Hope that helps. –  Ray Toal Jul 27 '11 at 1:01
1  
@Nath It's kind of hard to pick out exactly what's wrong, but I do see you are using arrays (and fixed one at size 10, which is not a general solution) instead of lists because as you say you haven't learned them yet. This is not a great problem to use arrays for, so I suggest you bite the bullet and learn lists. To that end, I went ahead and just wrote a complete Java application for you. It should run as is. –  Ray Toal Jul 28 '11 at 6:03
1  
Well yes the call is made multiple times with in the for-i loop, and multiple times as we descend deeper into levels of recursion. I just meant that it was NOT called multiple times in the for-u loop. If you look only at the for loop that says for (String u : interleave(...) you call interleave only once and then you iterate. Contrast that with the classic-for statement like for (i=0; f(x); i++) where f(x) is called every time within that loop. Hope that answers your question! –  Ray Toal Jul 29 '11 at 21:49
1  
java.sun.com/docs/books/jls/third_edition/html/…: In for(e1;e2;e3) the expression e2 is evaluated every time through the loop. In for (type x: a) where a is an array expression, the expression a is evaluated only once. –  Ray Toal Jul 30 '11 at 0:35

If I interpreted your question correctly - that you want all the permutations of all the characters in both strings, then the following code will help. You will need to write your own swap function, and somehow obtain an array of all the characters in both strings. This algorithm will permute from the i'th element up to the n'th element in the array. It is in C++, I would include a reference to where the algorithm is from but I can't remember.

void getPermutationsR(char characters[], int n, int i) 
{
    if (i == n)
    {
        //Output the current permutation
    } 
    else
    {
        for (int j=i; j<n; j++) 
        {
            swap (characters, i, j);
            getPermutationsR(characters, n, i+1);
            swap (characters, i, j);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
this is not what OP has asked. –  Trying Sep 3 '13 at 0:55

What you have now is a good start. The problem is that it returns just one string, instead a list of those.

Change your function to return a list of string, and then think about how you could combine several lists to produce all the output you want.

share|improve this answer
    
I haven't learned lists yet. Can I use array instead? –  Nath Jul 26 '11 at 23:43
    
Yes, but then you will have to calculate the right length before. For a list, you can simply add the elements one-by-one. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jul 26 '11 at 23:44
    
OK.I see. I don't know why I have to enter at least 15 characters when adding a comment. –  Nath Jul 26 '11 at 23:49
    
They want to avoid trivial comments like "OK. I see" :-p –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jul 26 '11 at 23:51
    
:) I got it.... –  Nath Jul 26 '11 at 23:54

Here is a solution using recursive approach, easy to understand too

public class Interleave {

public static List<String> interleave(String first, String second){
    if(first.length() == 0){
        List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();
        list.add(second);
        return list;
    }
    else if(second.length() == 0){
        List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();
        list.add(first);
        return list;
    }
    else{
        char c1 = first.charAt(0);
        List<String> listA =  multiply(c1,interleave(first.substring(1),second));
        char c2 = second.charAt(0);
        List<String> listB =  multiply(c2,interleave(first,second.substring(1)));
        listA.addAll(listB);
        return listA;
    }
}


public static List<String> multiply(char c,List<String> list){
        List<String> result = new ArrayList<String>();
        for(String str : list){
            String res = Character.toString(c) + str;
            result.add(res);
        }
    return result;
}

public static void main(String[] args){
    System.out.println(interleave("ab", "1234"));
    System.out.println(interleave("a", "b"));
    System.out.println(interleave("ab", "cd"));
}

 }
share|improve this answer

Below is the much better and simple to understand solution for this problem:

public class Interleaver {

    /**
     * Returns a list containing all possible interleavings of two strings.
     * The order of the characters within the strings is preserved.
     */
    public static String s1 = "abc";
    public static String s2 = "12";

    public static void interleave(int i, int j, String s) {

        if (i == s1.length() && j == s2.length()) {
            System.out.println("" + s);
        }

        if (i != s1.length()) {
            interleave(i + 1, j, s + s1.charAt(i));
        }

        if (j != s2.length()) {
            interleave(i, j + 1, s + s2.charAt(j));
        }

    }//Method ends here

    /**
     * Prints some example interleavings to stdout.
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        interleave(0, 0, "");
    }//Method ends here
}//Class ends here

Program is using just simple recursive calls to find the solution.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.