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How to take table level backup (dump) in MS SQL Server 2005/2008?

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12 Answers

You cannot use the BACKUP DATABASE command to backup a single table, unless of course the table in question is allocated to it's own FILEGROUP.

What you can do, as you have suggested is Export the table data to a CSV file. Now in order to get the definition of your table you can 'Script out' the CREATE TABLE script.

You can do this within SQL Server Management Studio, by:

right clicking Database > Tasks > Generate Script

You can then select the table you wish to script out and also choose to include any associated objects, such as constraints and indexes.

in order to get the DATA along with just the schema, you've got to choose Advanced on the set scripting options tab, and in the GENERAL section set the Types of data to script select Schema and Data

Hope this helps but feel free to contact me directly if you require further assitance.

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The 'Database Publishing Wizard' will automate the steps I have outlined. –  John Sansom Mar 25 '09 at 9:28
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John, Don't forget to mention that in order to get the DATA along with just the schema, you've got to choose Advanced on the set scripting options tab, and in the GENERAL section set the Types of data to script select Schema and Data. That wasn't obvious the first time I did it. –  Alex C Sep 16 '11 at 13:01
    
Alex's tip is very important. Also, is there a way to script this instead of going through menus in SQL Server? –  sooprise Jul 24 '12 at 14:00
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You should be able to achieve this by using a combination of PowerShell and SMO. See this article from Phil Factor as a guide: simple-talk.com/sql/database-administration/… –  John Sansom Jul 25 '12 at 6:01
    
@AlexC Thank you! Saved me a headache :) –  Simon Whitehead Nov 16 '12 at 0:27
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I am using bcp.exe to achieve table-level backups

to export:

bcp "select * from [MyDatabase].dbo.Customer " queryout "Customer.bcp" -N -S localhost -T -E

to import:

bcp [MyDatabase].dbo.Customer in "Customer.bcp" -N -S localhost -T -E -b 10000

as you can see, you can export based on any query, so you can even do incremental backups with this. Plus, it is scriptable as opposed to the other methods mentioned here that use SSMS.

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Here are the steps you need. Step5 is important if you want the data. Step 2 is where you can select individual tables.

EDIT stack's version isn't quite readbale... here's a fullsize image http://i.imgur.com/y6ZCL.jpg

Here are the steps from John Sansom's answer

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Perfect thanks for doing this –  Tom Stickel May 4 '12 at 7:42
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Thanks again for this! –  CryptoJones Jul 22 '13 at 17:09
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You can run the below query to take a backup of the existing table which would create a new table with existing structure of the old table along with the data.

select * into newtablename from oldtablename

To copy just the table structure, use the below query.

select * into newtablename from oldtablename where 1 = 2
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If you're looking for something like MySQL's DUMP, then good news: SQL Server 2008 Management Studio added that ability.

In SSMS, just right-click on the DB in question, select Tasks > Generate Scripts, and then in the 2nd page of the options wizard, make sure to select that you'd like the data scripted as well[[1]], and it will generate what amounts to a DUMP file for you.

1 http://updates.sqlservervideos.com/2009/01/wheres-that-been-all-my-life.html

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Create new filegroup, put this table on it, and backup this filegroup only.

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I don't know, whether it will match the problem described here. I had to take a table's incremental backup! (Only new inserted data should be copied). I used to design a DTS package where.

  1. I fetch new records (on the basis of a 'status' column) and transferred the data to destination. (Through 'Transform Data Task')

  2. Then I just updated the 'status' column. (Through 'Execute SQL Task')

I had to fix the 'workflow' properly.

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Every recovery model lets you back up a whole or partial SQL Server database or individual files or filegroups of the database. Table-level backups cannot be created.

From: Backup Overview (SQL Server)

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You can use the free Database Publishing Wizard from Microsoft to generate text files with SQL scripts (CREATE TABLE and INSERT INTO).

You can create such a file for a single table, and you can "restore" the complete table including the data by simply running the SQL script.

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+1 For all people which are used to SQL scripts, this is the option you are looking for. Uncheck the "Script all objects in the selected database" in order to select individual tables. Screenshots: products.secureserver.net/products/hosting/… –  lepe Nov 8 '12 at 5:15
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You probably have two options, as SQL Server doesn't support table backups. Both would start with scripting the table creation. Then you can either use the Script Table - INSERT option which will generate a lot of insert statements, or you can use Integration services (DTS with 2000) or similar to export the data as CSV or similar.

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BMC Recovery Manager (formerly known as SQLBacktrack) allows point-in-time recovery of individual objects in a database (aka tables). It is not cheap but does a fantastic job: http://www.bmc.com/products/proddocview/0,2832,19052_19429_70025639_147752,00.html

http://www.bmc.com/products/proddocview/0,2832,19052_19429_67883151_147636,00.html

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If you are looking to be able to restore a table after someone has mistakenly deleted rows from it you could maybe have a look at database snapshots. You could restore the table quite easily (or a subset of the rows) from the snapshot. See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms175158.aspx

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