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In the following XAML the editPanel is always visible. The overlayGrid is only visibile when a long operation has been kicked off by pressing the F5 key. The visual effect being that the editPanel is grayed out will the long process takes place.

<Window.InputBindings>
    <KeyBinding Key="F5" Command="{Binding Path=RefreshCommand}"/>
</Window.InputBindings>

<Grid>

    <StackPanel Name="editPanel">
        <TextBox>set focus here to see the problem.</TextBox>
        <CheckBox>set focus here to remove the problem.</CheckBox>
        <TextBlock Text="{Binding Path=Worker.Message}"/>
    </StackPanel>

    <Grid Name="overlayGrid" 
          Visibility="{Binding Path=Worker.Visibility}"
          Background="Gray" Opacity="0.5">

        <TextBox Text="{Binding Path=Worker.Message}" FontWeight="Bold" 
                 HorizontalAlignment="Center" VerticalAlignment="Center" 
                 />

    </Grid>

</Grid>

The overlayGrid displays exactly as expected except when the TextBox has focus. If the TextBox has focus the long operation takes place before you see a quick flicker of the overlayGrid. It's as though the code is: do long operation, show overlayGrid, collapse overlayGrid.

The ViewModel code that performs the long operation and changes the visibility of the overlayGrid is as follows:

Sub Refresh()

    Me.Worker.Message = String.Format("Refresh started at {0}..", 
                                      Date.Now.ToString("hh:mm:ss.fff")
    )

    Me.Worker.Visibility = Visibility.Visible

    ' Give the UI a chance to update itself.
    System.Windows.Forms.Application.DoEvents()

    Console.WriteLine("Debug: " + Me.Worker.Message)

    ' Fake the long operation.
    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000)

    Me.Worker.Message = String.Format("Refresh completed at {0}.", 
                                      Date.Now.ToString("hh:mm:ss.fff")
    )

    Me.Worker.Visibility = Visibility.Collapsed

    Console.WriteLine("Debug: " + Me.Worker.Message)

End Sub

Why is the actual visibility of overlayGrid delayed when a TextBox has focus? How do I work around this issue?

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

AFAIK, using System.Windows.Forms.Application.DoEvents() was discouraged even in WinForms. You certainly shouldn't be using that in WPF, even if it worked (apparently, it doesn't).

What you should do instead is to run the long operation on a background thread and then use Dispatcher.Invoke() to set the result on the UI. Something like:

Sub Refresh()

    Me.Worker.Message = String.Format("Refresh started at {0}..",
                                      Date.Now.ToString("hh:mm:ss.fff")
    )

    Me.Worker.Visibility = Visibility.Visible

    Console.WriteLine("Debug: " + Me.Worker.Message)

    Task.Factory.StartNew(
        Function()
            ' Fake the long operation.
            System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(10000)

            Dispatcher.Invoke(
                Function()
                    Me.Worker.Message = String.Format("Refresh completed at {0}.",
                                                      Date.Now.ToString("hh:mm:ss.fff")
                    )

                    Me.Worker.Visibility = Visibility.Collapsed

                    Console.WriteLine("Debug: " + Me.Worker.Message)

                End Function)

        End Function)

End Sub
share|improve this answer
    
You solution does work. However in my "real" program I have a multiple list boxes bound to ObservableCollections that are updated during the long operation. Of course this throws an exception because of the background thread. Therefore I was trying to use single thread. –  Tim Murphy Jul 24 '11 at 12:27
    
@Tim, you should never do any long operations on the UI thread, because that will block it. Either use Dispatcher.Invoke() every time you modify the collection, or cache the changes and then do the modifications all at once when the operation is done. –  svick Jul 24 '11 at 13:07
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